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Bumetanide

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

By mouth

Bumetanide belongs to a group of medicines called loop diuretics or "water pills." Bumetanide is given to help treat fluid retention (edema) and swelling… Read more

Brand names include: Bumex

Injection route

Bumetanide belongs to a group of medicines called loop diuretics or "water pills." Bumetanide is given to help treat fluid retention (edema) and swelling… Read more

Brand names include: Bumex

By injection

Treats fluid retention (edema). This medicine is a diuretic… Read more

Brand names include: Bumetanide Novaplus

Drug classes About this
Cardiovascular Agent, Diuretic, Loop

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Dementia: A NICE-SCIE Guideline on Supporting People With Dementia and Their Carers in Health and Social Care

This guideline has been developed to advise on supporting people with dementia and their carers in health and social care. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary team of health and social care professionals, a person with dementia, carers and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guideline will be useful to practitioners and service commissioners in providing and planning high-quality care for those with dementia while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for people with dementia and carers.

Loop diuretics for patients receiving blood transfusions

Blood transfusions are often complicated by water retention, which may worsen lung function, heart function and/or kidney function. Loop diuretics, medications that reduce body water by making the kidneys excrete more urine, are thought to prevent water retention. Accordingly, many doctors pre‐medicate their blood transfusion recipients with loop diuretics.

Acute Kidney Injury: Prevention, Detection and Management Up to the Point of Renal Replacement Therapy [Internet]

Acute kidney injury (AKI), previously called acute renal failure, has chiefly been described as a syndrome since World War 2. Traditionally ‘acute renal failure’ was regarded as a less common organ failure, with patients typically requiring dialysis and managed by nephrologists. This view has now been overturned. AKI encompasses a wide spectrum of injury to the kidneys, not just ‘kidney failure’. It is a common problem amongst hospitalised patients, in particular the elderly population whose numbers are increasing as people live longer. Such patients are usually under the care of doctors practicing in specialties other than nephrology. For normal function the kidneys require a competent circulation. Conversely, it is known that renal function is vulnerable to even relative or quite modest hypotension or hypovolaemia. Hence AKI is a feature of many severe illnesses. Although these illnesses may affect many organs, the simple process of monitoring urine output and/or creatinine permits detection of AKI.

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Summaries for consumers

Loop diuretics for patients receiving blood transfusions

Blood transfusions are often complicated by water retention, which may worsen lung function, heart function and/or kidney function. Loop diuretics, medications that reduce body water by making the kidneys excrete more urine, are thought to prevent water retention. Accordingly, many doctors pre‐medicate their blood transfusion recipients with loop diuretics.

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