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Aminocaproic Acid

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

By mouth

Aminocaproic acid is an antifibrinolytic agent. It is used to treat serious bleeding conditions, especially when the bleeding occurs after dental surgery… Read more

Brand names include: Amicar

By injection

Aminocaproic acid injection is an antifibrinolytic agent. It is used to treat serious bleeding conditions, especially when the bleeding occurs after dental… Read more

Brand names include: Amicar, Aminocaproic Acid Novaplus

Drug classes About this
Hemostatic

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Antifibrinolytics (tranexamic acid and epsilon‐aminocaproic acid) to prevent bleeding in people with low platelets due to bone marrow failure

We evaluated the evidence about whether giving antifibrinolytics (tranexamic acid or epsilon‐aminocaproic acid) to people with a low platelet count prevents bleeding and whether these antifibrinolytics are associated with side effects. Our target population was people with haematological disorders who have a low platelet count and would usually be treated with platelet transfusions. We did not include people with immune thrombocytopenia because they are not usually treated with platelet transfusions.

Haemostatic drug therapies for acute spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage

More than one tenth of all strokes are caused by bleeding in the brain (known as intracerebral haemorrhage). Most of these intracerebral haemorrhages do not have an identifiable cause. The bigger the haemorrhage, the more likely it is to be fatal. Roughly one third of these haemorrhages enlarge significantly within the first 24 hours. Therefore, drugs that promote clotting ‐ known as haemostatic drugs ‐ might reduce the risk of death or being disabled after an intracerebral haemorrhage by limiting its growth, if given soon after the bleeding starts. But haemostatic drugs can cause unwanted clotting, such as heart attacks and clots in leg veins. I reviewed the evidence in 1398 adults from five phase II randomised controlled trials and one phase III randomised controlled trial. Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) was the most widely tested drug. rFVIIa did not significantly reduce the risk of a bad outcome (death or dependence) within 90 days of intracerebral haemorrhage, when compared against placebo. I found no evidence of benefit from haemostatic drug treatments for people with spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage, though further trials appear justified.

Blood‐clot promoting drugs for acute traumatic injury

This is an update of an existing Cochrane review, the last version was published in 2012.

See all (28)

Summaries for consumers

Antifibrinolytics (tranexamic acid and epsilon‐aminocaproic acid) to prevent bleeding in people with low platelets due to bone marrow failure

We evaluated the evidence about whether giving antifibrinolytics (tranexamic acid or epsilon‐aminocaproic acid) to people with a low platelet count prevents bleeding and whether these antifibrinolytics are associated with side effects. Our target population was people with haematological disorders who have a low platelet count and would usually be treated with platelet transfusions. We did not include people with immune thrombocytopenia because they are not usually treated with platelet transfusions.

Haemostatic drug therapies for acute spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage

More than one tenth of all strokes are caused by bleeding in the brain (known as intracerebral haemorrhage). Most of these intracerebral haemorrhages do not have an identifiable cause. The bigger the haemorrhage, the more likely it is to be fatal. Roughly one third of these haemorrhages enlarge significantly within the first 24 hours. Therefore, drugs that promote clotting ‐ known as haemostatic drugs ‐ might reduce the risk of death or being disabled after an intracerebral haemorrhage by limiting its growth, if given soon after the bleeding starts. But haemostatic drugs can cause unwanted clotting, such as heart attacks and clots in leg veins. I reviewed the evidence in 1398 adults from five phase II randomised controlled trials and one phase III randomised controlled trial. Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) was the most widely tested drug. rFVIIa did not significantly reduce the risk of a bad outcome (death or dependence) within 90 days of intracerebral haemorrhage, when compared against placebo. I found no evidence of benefit from haemostatic drug treatments for people with spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage, though further trials appear justified.

Blood‐clot promoting drugs for acute traumatic injury

This is an update of an existing Cochrane review, the last version was published in 2012.

See all (9)

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