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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

Effects of self-management health information technology on glycaemic control for patients with diabetes: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Review published: 2013.

Bibliographic details: Tao D, Or CK.  Effects of self-management health information technology on glycaemic control for patients with diabetes: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare 2013; 19: 133-143. [PubMed: 23563018]

Abstract

We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which had evaluated self-management health information technology (SMHIT) for glycaemic control in patients with diabetes. A total of 43 RCTs was identified, which reported on 52 control-intervention comparisons. The glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) data were pooled using a random effects meta-analysis method, followed by a meta-regression and subgroup analyses to examine the effects of a set of moderators. The meta-analysis showed that use of SMHITs was associated with a significant reduction in HbA1c compared to usual care, with a pooled standardized mean difference of -0.30% (95% CI -0.39 to -0.21, P < 0.001). Sample size, age, study setting, type of application and method of data entry significantly moderated the effects of SMHIT use. The review supports the use of SMHITs as a self-management approach to improve glycaemic control. The effect of SMHIT use is significantly greater when the technology is a web-based application, when a mechanism for patients' health data entry is provided (manual or automatic) and when the technology is operated in the home or without location restrictions. Integrating these variables into the design of SMHITs may augment the effectiveness of the interventions.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 23563018

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