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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

The efficacy and safety of bisphosphonates for osteoporosis or osteopenia in Crohn's disease: a meta-analysis

Review published: 2013.

Bibliographic details: Guo Z, Wu R, Gong J, Zhu W, Li Y, Li N, Li J.  The efficacy and safety of bisphosphonates for osteoporosis or osteopenia in Crohn's disease: a meta-analysis. Digestive Diseases and Sciences 2013; 58(4): 915-922. [PubMed: 23179146]

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Crohn's disease impacts the bone health of patients and results in a high prevalence of low bone mineral density (BMD) disease such as osteoporosis and osteopenia. Bisphosphonates can reduce bone loss by inhibiting bone resorption.

AIM: To assess the effectiveness and safety of bisphosphonates for osteoporosis or osteopenia in Crohn's disease.

METHODS: A literature search included PubMed, EMBASE, the Science Citation Index, and the Cochrane Library was conducted to identify studies up to March, 2012. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing bisphosphonates with placebo or no intervention for osteoporosis or osteopenia in adult patients with Crohn's disease were analyzed.

RESULTS: Five RCTs involving 423 participants were included. All patients received daily calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Overall, bisphosphonates improved hip BMD at 12 months (n = 193, MD = 0.99, 95 % CI: 0.14-1.84) compared with placebos or no intervention. No significant differences of spine BMD at both 12 months (n = 193, MD = 1.78, 95 % CI: -0.99 to 4.55) and 24 months (n = 231, MD = 0.70 %, 95 % CI: -0.48 to 1.88), hip BMD at 24 months (n = 231, MD = 0.25 %, 95 % CI: -0.65 to 1.15), new vertebral fractures (n = 117, RD = -0.01, 95 % CI: -0.08 to 0.05) or adverse events (n = 422, RR = 1.03, 95 % CI: 0.71-1.49) between bisphosphonates groups and control groups were noted. Subgroup analyses of participants treated with corticosteroid in the preceding year found no difference between two groups.

CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence to support the use of bisphosphonates for osteoporosis or osteopenia in Crohn's disease. More randomized controlled clinical trials assessing the effects of bisphosphonates are needed.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 23179146

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