Home > DARE Reviews > A systematic literature review and...

PubMed Health. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

A systematic literature review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials of parenteral glutamine supplementation

Review published: 2013.

Bibliographic details: Bollhalder L, Pfeil AM, Tomonaga Y, Schwenkglenks M.  A systematic literature review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials of parenteral glutamine supplementation. Clinical Nutrition 2013; 32(2): 213-223. [PubMed: 23196117]

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Glutamine supplementation has been associated with reduced mortality, infections and hospital length of stay in critically ill patients and patients undergoing major surgery. We carried out a meta-analysis to examine randomized clinical trial (RCT)-based evidence of these effects.

METHODS: Based on a systematic database search, RCTs published since 1990 were included if they evaluated the effect of parenteral glutamine supplementation against a background of parenteral nutrition. Enteral (tube) feeding in a proportion of patients was allowable. Information on RCT methodology, quality and outcomes was extracted. Random effects meta-analysis followed the DerSimonian-Laird approach.

RESULTS: Forty RCTs were eligible for meta-analysis. Parenteral glutamine supplementation was associated with a non-significant 11% reduction in short-term mortality (RR = 0.89; 95% CI, 0.77-1.04). Infections were significantly reduced (RR = 0.83; 95% CI, 0.72-0.95) and length of stay was 2.35 days shorter (95% CI, -3.68 to -1.02) in the glutamine arms. Meta-analysis results were strongly influenced by one recent trial. An element of publication bias could not be excluded.

CONCLUSION: Parenteral glutamine supplementation in severely ill patients may reduce infections, length of stay and mortality, but substantial uncertainty remains. Unlike previous meta-analyses, we could not demonstrate a significant reduction in mortality.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 23196117

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...