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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

Intervention to increase condom use and HIV testing among men who have sex with men in China: a meta-analysis

Review published: 2013.

Bibliographic details: Huang Z, Wang M, Fu L, Fang Y, Hao J, Tao F, Tu C.  Intervention to increase condom use and HIV testing among men who have sex with men in China: a meta-analysis. AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses 2013; 29(3): 441-448. [PubMed: 23083341]

Abstract

Behavioral interventions have been shown to both promote and change many health-related behaviors and issues. This meta-analysis was performed to assess whether behavioral interventions have the potential to increase condom use and HIV testing uptake among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Wanfang (Chinese) were searched to June 2011 to identify relevant articles. Data of eligible citations were extracted by two reviewers. Sixteen studies were identified. Aggregated findings indicated that interventions were associated with a significant increase in condom use between MSM and male sex partners in the last anal sex act (RR=1.17, 95% CI=1.05-1.29) and consistent condom use between MSM and male sex partners in the past 6 months (RR=1.36, 95% CI=1.15-1.60) and HIV testing (RR=2.22, 95% CI=1.72-2.88). However, no significant increase was detected in condom use over the course of the intervention among MSM engaging in sex with women. In the subgroup analyses, the positive effects were not detected in some subgroups such as anal sex with casual partners and intervention interval less than or equal to 6 months. The sensitivity analysis showed that these estimates were unchanged after removal of the study that had the biggest sample or the studies that had the most rigorous study design. This meta-analysis can inform future intervention design and implementation in terms of sample size, target populations, settings, goals for process measures, and intervention interval.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 23083341

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