Home > DARE Reviews > Multivisceral resection for gastric...

PubMed Health. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

Multivisceral resection for gastric cancer: a systematic review

Review published: 2012.

Bibliographic details: Brar SS, Seevaratnam R, Cardoso R, Yohanathan L, Law C, Helyer L, Coburn NG.  Multivisceral resection for gastric cancer: a systematic review. Gastric Cancer 2012; 15(1 Supplement): S100-S107. [PubMed: 21785926]

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The overall prognosis and survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer is generally poor. One of the most powerful predictors of outcomes in gastric cancer surgery is an R0 resection. However, the extent of the required surgical resection and the additional benefit of multivisceral resection (MVR) are controversial.

METHODS: Electronic literature searches were conducted using Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2009. All search titles and abstracts were independently rated for relevance by a minimum of two reviewers.

RESULTS: Seventeen studies were included in this review. Among the 1343 patients who underwent MVR, overall complication rates ranged from 11.8 to 90.5%. Perioperative mortality was found to be 0-15%. Pathological T4 disease was confirmed in 28.8-89% of patients. R0 resection and extent of nodal involvement were important predictors of survival in patients undergoing MVR. Patient outcomes may also be affected by the number of organs resected.

CONCLUSIONS: Gastrectomy with MVR can be safely pursued in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer to achieve an R0 resection. MVR may not be beneficial in patients with extensive nodal disease.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 21785926

Download

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...