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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

The clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of low-intensity psychological interventions for the secondary prevention of relapse after depression: a systematic review

M Rodgers, M Asaria, S Walker, D McMillan, M Lucock, M Harden, S Palmer, and A Eastwood.

Review published: 2012.

CRD summary

This systematic review involved CRD reviewers. It assessed the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of low-intensity psychological or psychosocial interventions to prevent relapse or recurrence of depression. The evidence, up to September 2010, was insufficient to draw any conclusions, and further research was needed.

Objectives

To systematically review the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of low-intensity psychological or psychosocial interventions to prevent relapse or recurrence of depression.

Review methods

Eight databases, including MEDLINE, PsycINFO and DARE, were searched for studies published after 1950 up to September, 2010. Additional databases were searched for cost-effectiveness studies.

Studies had to be of adults or adolescents, receiving either a low-intensity intervention delivered by para-professionals, peer supporters or psychological well-being practitioners, or less than six hours of intervention from a qualified mental health professional. Studies had to have a control group. Studies including children and participants with bipolar disorder were excluded. The main outcomes were relapse or recurrence; social function and quality of life were also assessed. The data were combined in a narrative.

Two reviewers independently selected studies. One reviewer extracted the data into a standard form, and for low-intensity studies, assessed quality using a National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) checklist. Extracted data and quality were checked by a second reviewer. Any discrepancies were resolved together, or by a third reviewer.

Results of the review

No studies of low-intensity interventions delivered by para-professionals, peer supporters or psychological well-being practitioners were found.

Seventeen studies of brief (less than six hours) professional intervention were included. These studies were diverse and had mixed findings. One compared a collaborative care programme against usual care. This was a US randomised controlled trial, and no significant reduction in relapse of depression was found after one year.

Two cost-effectiveness studies were found. One was an analysis of the US trial data, and the other was inconclusive.

Conclusions

The evidence was insufficient to draw any conclusions. Further research was needed.

Funding

Funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme, UK.

Bibliographic details

Rodgers M, Asaria M, Walker S, McMillan D, Lucock M, Harden M, Palmer S, Eastwood A. The clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of low-intensity psychological interventions for the secondary prevention of relapse after depression: a systematic review. Health Technology Assessment 2012; 16(28): 1-129. [PMC free article: PMC4781580] [PubMed: 22642789]

Indexing Status

Subject indexing assigned by NLM

MeSH

Cost-Benefit Analysis; Depression /economics /prevention & control /therapy; Great Britain; Humans; Psychotherapy /economics /methods; Recurrence; Secondary Prevention /economics /methods; Treatment Outcome

AccessionNumber

12012046795

Database entry date

25/04/2014

Record Status

This is a high quality systematic review involving CRD that meets the criteria for inclusion on DARE. This structured abstract presents a brief summary of the review methods, the results and conclusions.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 22642789

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