Table 32aSummary of the impact of health IT applications on responsiveness to a patient’s needs, preferences, and values for patients with cancer

Study, YearHealth IT ApplicationIntervention ComparedOutcomes MeasurePositive Impact*
Frosch, 2008282Clinical decision aidsTraditional didactic decision aid providing information about PSA screening options and outcomes vs. links to public prostate cancer–specific Web sites from credible sourcesPSA screening - pretest choice+
PSA screening - reduction+
Watchful waiting at pretest
Chronic disease trajectory model for prostate cancer followed by a time–trade-off exercise vs. links to public prostate cancer–specific Web sites from credible sourcesPSA screening - pretest choice+
PSA screening - reduction+
Watchful waiting at pretest
Both the didactic decision aid and the chronic disease trajectory model vs. links to public prostate cancer–specific Web sites from credible sources (control condition)PSA screening - pretest choice+
PSA screening - reduction+
Watchful waiting at pretest+
Ruland, 200347mHealth, shared decisionmaking toolsComputerized system for shared decisionmaking for cancer symptoms care vs. usual carecongruence between patient reported symptoms and those addressed in consult visit+
Importance-weighted congruence between patient reported symptoms and those addressed in consult visit+
Number of reported symptoms (0–10)+
Number of reported symptoms (0–15)+
Number of reported symptoms (0–20)+
Number of reported symptoms (0–25)+
Number of reported symptoms (0–30)+
Number of reported symptoms (0–40)+
Number of reported symptoms (0–50)+
Taenzer, 2000216Clinical decision aids, IT-guided disease managementClinician receive QOL training and patients complete the computerized EORTC QLQ-C30 vs. patients completed a paper-and pencil version of the EORTC QLQ-C30 onlyActions taken / patient+
Percentage of categories identified that were acted upon+
Physical functioning (higher indicate better function)
Role functioning (higher indicate better function)
Emotional functioning (higher indicate better function)
Cognitive functioning (higher indicate better function)
Social functioning (higher indicate better function)
Global functioning (higher indicate better function)
Number of functional scales indicating compromised function (mean)
Fatigue (higher scores indicate more symptomatology-mean)
Nausea and vomiting (higher scores indicate more symptomatology-mean)+
Pain (higher scores indicate more symptomatology-mean)
Dyspnea (higher scores indicate more symptomatology-mean)
Sleep disturbance (higher scores indicate more symptomatology)
Appetite (higher scores indicate more symptomatology)+
Constipation (higher scores indicate more symptomatology)
Diarrhea (higher scores indicate more symptomatology)+
Financial difficulties (higher scores indicate more symptomatology)+
Number of symptom scales indicating compromised functioning
Number of functional and symptom scales indicating compromised function
Total number of items endorsed+

IT: Information Technology, mHealth: Mobile Health, PSA: Prostate Specific Antigen

EORTC-QLQ: European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire, IT: Information Technology, PSA: Prostate specific antigen, QOL: Quality of Life

*

“+” indicates that the intervention had a positive effect on the outcome in comparison with the control

“−” indicates that the intervention had a negative effect on the outcome in comparison with the control

“0” indicates that the intervention had no effect on the outcome in comparison with the control

From: Results

Cover of Enabling Patient-Centered Care Through Health Information Technology
Enabling Patient-Centered Care Through Health Information Technology.
Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments, No. 206.
Finkelstein J, Knight A, Marinopoulos S, et al.

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