ClinicalStrength training

Additional, progressive strength training produces a statistically significant and clinically significant increase in leg extensor power, hip flexor strength and walking speed compared to placebo motor training (control) at 3 months after surgery. (HIGH QUALITY)

There is no statistically significant difference in basic or extended activities of daily living or gait and balance as measure by the Performance Orientated Mobility Assessment with strength training compared to placebo motor training (control) at 3 months after surgery. (HIGH QUALITY)

There is no statistically significant difference in timed up and go test and chair rises with strength training compared to placebo motor training (control) at 3 months after surgery. (MODERATE QUALITY)

Weight bearing exercise and treadmill training

There is no statistically significant difference in functional performance tests, quality of life, walking speed or pain with weight bearing exercise and treadmill gait training compared to the control. (HIGH QUALITY)

There is no statistically significant difference in length of hospital stay with weight bearing exercise and treadmill gait training compared to the control. (MODERATE QUALITY)

Intensive (more frequent) physiotherapy

There is no statistically significant difference in knee extensor strength adductor muscle strength or length of stay in hospital with an increased number of physiotherapy sessions per day compared to the control. (LOW QUALITY)
EconomicAll intensive exercise and physiotherapy programmes are more expensive than usual care, albeit the strength programme is only slightly more costly compared to usual care.

This evidence has minor limitations and partial applicability.

From: 11, Mobilisation strategies

Cover of The Management of Hip Fracture in Adults
The Management of Hip Fracture in Adults [Internet].
NICE Clinical Guidelines, No. 124.
National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).
Copyright © 2011, National Clinical Guideline Centre.

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