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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

Imageless computer assisted versus conventional total knee replacement: a Bayesian meta-analysis of 23 comparative studies

Review published: 2011.

Bibliographic details: Brin YS, Nikolaou VS, Joseph L, Zukor DJ, Antoniou J.  Imageless computer assisted versus conventional total knee replacement: a Bayesian meta-analysis of 23 comparative studies. International Orthopaedics 2011; 35(3): 331-339. [PMC free article: PMC3047658] [PubMed: 20376440]

Abstract

We have undertaken a meta-analysis of the English literature, to assess the component alignment outcomes after imageless computer assisted (CAOS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) versus conventional TKA. We reviewed 23 publications that met the inclusion criteria. Results were summarised via a Bayesian hierarchical random effects meta-analysis model. Separate analyses were conducted for prospective randomised trials alone, as well as for all randomised and observational studies. In 20 papers (4,199 TKAs) we found a reduction in outliers rate of approximately 80% in limb mechanical axis when operated with the CAOS. For the coronal femoral and tibial implants positions, the analysis included 3,058 TKAs. The analysis for the femoral implant showed a reduction in outliers rate of approximately 87% and for the tibial implant a reduction in outliers rate of approximately 80%. Imageless navigation when performing TKA improves component orientation and postoperative limb alignment. The clinical significance of these findings though has to be proven in the future.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 20376440

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