Home > DARE Reviews > A meta-analysis of obesity interventions...

PubMed Health. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

A meta-analysis of obesity interventions among US minority children

Review published: 2010.

Bibliographic details: Seo DC, Sa J.  A meta-analysis of obesity interventions among US minority children. Journal of Adolescent Health 2010; 46(4): 309-323. [PubMed: 20307819]

Abstract

PURPOSE: To quantitatively evaluate the efficacy of interventions designed to prevent or treat obesity among U.S. minority children using meta-analytic techniques.

METHODS: A total of 40 intervention trials involving 10,725 children aged 6-19 years were examined.

RESULTS: Interventions with more components showed a higher mean effect size than those with fewer components: among 32 controlled trials, d = .07 for one-component (n = 6); d = .08 for two-component (n = 15); d = .33 for three-component (n = 10); and d = .71 for four-component (n = 1) interventions. Interventions with parental involvement (n = 22, d = .21) and lifestyle interventions (n = 14, d = .34) showed a greater mean effect size than those without parental involvement (n = 10, d = .05) or lifestyle interventions (n = 18, d = .04), despite the fact that their 90% confidence intervals overlapped. Among uncontrolled trials (n = 8), two-component interventions (n = 5) yielded d = .86 and three-component interventions (n = 3) yielded d = .96.

CONCLUSIONS: Evidence indicates that, among U.S. minority children, obesity interventions with three or more components might be more efficacious than those using fewer components. Parental involvement, lifestyle change, culturally-based adaptation, and interactive computer programs seem to show promise in the reduction of obese minority children.

Copyright 2010 Society for Adolescent Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 20307819

Download

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...