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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

Effectiveness of psychoeducation for relapse, symptoms, knowledge, adherence and functioning in psychotic disorders: a meta-analysis

Review published: 2007.

Bibliographic details: Lincoln T M, Wilhelm K, Nestoriuc Y.  Effectiveness of psychoeducation for relapse, symptoms, knowledge, adherence and functioning in psychotic disorders: a meta-analysis. Schizophrenia Research 2007; 96(1-3): 232-245. [PubMed: 17826034]

Abstract

Psychoeducation (PE) for schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders is widely adopted but insufficiently evaluated. So far, meta-analytic data has demonstrated efficacy for PE when interventions include family members. Whether PE directed solely at patients is also effective remains unclear. The current meta-analysis evaluates short- and long-term efficacy of PE with and without inclusion of families with regard to relapse, symptom-reduction, knowledge, medication adherence, and functioning. Randomized controlled trials comparing PE to standard care or non-specific interventions were included. A literature search in the Cochrane Library, PsycINFO and Medline retrieved 199 studies for closer examination, of which 18 studies, reporting on 19 comparisons, met the inclusion criteria. These studies were coded with regard to methodology, participants, interventions and validity. Effect sizes were integrated using the fixed effects model for homogeneous effects and the random effects model for heterogeneous effects. Independent of treatment modality, PE produced a medium effect at post-treatment for relapse and a small effect size for knowledge. PE had no effect on symptoms, functioning and medication adherence. Effect sizes for relapse and rehospitalization remained significant for 12 months after treatment but failed significance for longer follow-up periods. Interventions that included families were more effective in reducing symptoms by the end of treatment and preventing relapse at 7-12 month follow-up. Effects achieved for PE directed at patients alone were not significant. It is concluded that the additional effort of integrating families in PE is worthwhile, while patient-focused interventions alone need further improvement and research.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 17826034

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