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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

Use of cardiac markers to assess the toxic effects of anthracyclines given to children with cancer: a systematic review

Review published: 2007.

Bibliographic details: Bryant J, Picot J, Baxter L, Levitt G, Sullivan I, Clegg A.  Use of cardiac markers to assess the toxic effects of anthracyclines given to children with cancer: a systematic review. European Journal of Cancer 2007; 43(13): 1959-1966. [PubMed: 17689066]

Abstract

AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of cardiac markers to quantify anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity in children with cancer.

METHODS: Systematic review using a priori methods.

RESULTS: Seven studies, all with methodological limitations, were identified. One RCT suggests that cardiac troponin can be used to assess the effectiveness of the cardio-protective agent dexrazoxane. Cohort studies suggest that atrial natriuretic peptide and brain (B-type) natriuretic peptide are elevated in some subgroups of patients compared with healthy children; NT-pro-BNP levels are significantly elevated in children with cardiac dysfunction compared with those without; serum lipid peroxide is higher in children who have received doxorubicin compared with children not receiving doxorubicin; there are no differences in carnitine levels between children treated with doxorubicin and a healthy control group.

CONCLUSIONS: The limited evidence makes conclusions difficult. Research is needed to fill this important evidence gap and link short-term changes in cardiac markers to longer-term cardiac damage.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 17689066

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