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Analgesics for Osteoarthritis: An Update of the 2006 Comparative Effectiveness Review [Internet]

Analgesics for Osteoarthritis: An Update of the 2006 Comparative Effectiveness Review [Internet]

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US)

Version: October 2011

Introduction

Osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, is associated with substantial disability and reduced quality of life. Twenty-seven million adults in the United States are thought to have clinical osteoarthritis. In large surveys, 5 percent to 17 percent of U.S. adults had symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee, and 9 percent had symptomatic osteoarthritis of the hip. Osteoarthritis is more common with increasing age. Osteoarthritis accounts for more disability in walking, stair climbing, and other tasks requiring use of the lower extremities than any other disease, particularly in the elderly. The total costs for arthritis, including osteoarthritis, may be greater than 2 percent of the gross domestic product, with more than half of these costs related to work loss.

Methods

The topic for the original 2006 report was nominated in a public process. The key questions for that report were developed by investigators from the Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) with input from a Technical Expert Panel (TEP), which helped to refine key questions, identify important issues, and define parameters for the review of evidence.

Results

For the original comparative efectiveness review (CER), searches identified 2,789 publications: 1,522 from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, 68 from the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 1,015 from MEDLINE and 184 from the combination of other sources listed above. There were also 59 studies not previously reviewed for inclusion that were suggested through peer review or public comment or published after the searches were conducted. Following application of inclusion criteria, 321 publications were included in the original CER.

Executive Summary

Osteoarthritis is a chronic condition involving degeneration of cartilage within the joints. It is the most common form of arthritis and is associated with pain, substantial disability, and reduced quality of life. Surveys indicate that 5 to 17 percent of United States (U.S.) adults have symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee, and 9 percent have symptomatic osteoarthritis of the hip. Osteoarthritis is more common with older age. The total costs for arthritis, including osteoarthritis, may be greater than 2 percent of the gross domestic product, with more than half of these costs related to work loss.,

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