Cohort study

An observational study that takes a group (cohort) of patients and follows their progress over time in order to measure outcomes such as disease or mortality rates and make comparisons according to the treatments or interventions that patients received. Thus, within the study group, subgroups of patients are identified (from information collected about patients) and these groups are compared with respect to outcome, e.g. comparing mortality between one group that received a specific treatment and one group that did not (or between two groups that received different levels of treatment). Cohorts can be assembled in the present and followed into the future (a ‘concurrent’ or ‘prospective’ cohort study) or identified from past records and followed forward from that time up to the present (a ‘historical’ or ‘retrospective’ cohort study). Because patients are not randomly allocated to subgroups, these subgroups may be quite different in their characteristics and some adjustment must be made when analysing the results to ensure that the comparison between groups is as fair as possible.