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Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet]. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd; 2003-. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD003585.pub2

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet].

Occupational therapy for patients with problems in activities of daily living after stroke

This version published: 2008; Review content assessed as up-to-date: May 21, 2006.

Link to full article: [Cochrane Library]

Plain language summary

Occupational therapy aims to help people reach their maximum level of function and independence in all aspects of daily living. Reviewing nine studies with 1258 participants, people who had a stroke were more independent in personal activities of daily living (feeding, dressing, bathing, toileting and moving about) and more likely to maintain these abilities if they received treatment from an occupational therapist. However, we still need to understand the best form of this occupational therapy input (for example, what should be provided, when it should be provided, how often and for how long) before we can plan how to best use it in health and social care settings.

Abstract

Background: Occupational therapy aims to help people reach their maximum level of function and independence in all aspects of daily life.

Objectives: To determine whether occupational therapy focused specifically on personal activities of daily living improves recovery for patients following stroke.

Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched January 2006). In addition, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2006), MEDLINE (1966 to March 2006), EMBASE (1980 to March 2006), CINAHL (1983 to March 2006), PsycLIT (1974 to March 2006), AMED (1985 to March 2006), Wilson Social Sciences Abstracts (1984 to March 2006) and the following Web of Science databases: Science Citation Index (1945 to March 2006), Social Science Citation Index (1956 to March 2006) and Arts and Humanities Citation Index (1975 to March 2006). In an effort to identify further published, unpublished and ongoing trials we searched The Occupational Therapy Research Index and Dissertation Abstracts register, scanned reference lists of relevant articles, contacted authors and researchers and handsearched relevant journals.

Selection criteria: We identified randomised controlled trials of an occupational therapy intervention (compared to usual care or no care) where stroke patients practiced personal activities of daily living, or performance in activities of daily living was the focus of the occupational therapy intervention.

Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently selected trials and extracted data for pre‐specified outcomes. The primary outcomes were the proportion of patients who had deteriorated or were dependent in personal activities of daily living and performance in personal activities of daily living at the end of follow up.

Main results: We identified 64 potentially eligible trials and included nine studies (1258 participants). Occupational therapy interventions reduced the odds of a poor outcome (Peto odds ratio 0.67 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.51 to 0.87; P = 0.003). and increased personal activity of daily living scores (standardised mean difference 0.18 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.32; P = 0.01). For every 11 (95% CI 7 to 30) patients receiving an occupational therapy intervention to facilitate personal activities of daily living, one patient was spared a poor outcome.

Authors' conclusions: Patients who receive occupational therapy interventions are less likely to deteriorate and are more likely to be independent in their ability to perform personal activities of daily living. However, the exact nature of the occupational therapy intervention to achieve maximum benefit needs to be defined.

Editorial Group: Cochrane Stroke Group.

Publication status: Edited (no change to conclusions).

Citation: Legg L, Drummond A, Langhorne P. Occupational therapy for patients with problems in activities of daily living after stroke. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2006, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD003585. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003585.pub2. Link to Cochrane Library. [PubMed: 17054178]

Copyright © 2009 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 17054178

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