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About - Strep Throat

Caused by a group A streptococcal infection. Common symptoms include fever, sore throat, and enlarged lymph nodes. Strep throat is a contagious infection, spread through close contact with an infected individual.

Results: 1 to 20 of 44

Penicillin reduces the risk of streptococcal throat infections and attacks of rheumatic fever in people who have already had a bout of rheumatic fever

Rheumatic fever is a rare complication of throat infection, that can damage the heart. People who have had rheumatic fever can suffer from it again following streptococcal throat infection if they do not receive regular penicillin. Penicillin for prevention can be given by injection or as tablets. Taking tablets is easier but might not work as well as injections. The review of trials compared different ways of giving penicillin. Penicillin seemed to work better as injections than as tablets. Injections given every two or three weeks worked better than when given every four weeks. However, more research is needed.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

The effect of short duration versus standard duration antibiotic therapy for streptococcal throat infection in children

Streptococcal (strep) throat infection is very common. A 10‐day course of penicillin is prescribed mainly to protect against the complication of acute rheumatic fever, which can occur approximately 20 days after streptococcal throat and cause damage to the heart valves. Cases of acute rheumatic fever have dropped dramatically in high‐income countries. Newer antibiotics taken for a shorter duration, may have a comparable effect to penicillin taken for 10 days.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Different antibiotics for group A streptococcal pharyngitis

We wanted to know which antibiotic was more effective in treating sore throats caused by bacteria (group A beta‐haemolytic streptococci (GABHS)).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

What is the performance of rapid tests for the diagnosis of strep throat in children?

Sore throat is very common in children. It can be caused by viruses or bacteria. The bacterium most frequently identified during sore throat in children is group A streptococcus ('strep throat'). Amongst children with sore throat, antibiotic treatment is only useful in those with strep throat.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Antibiotics or tonsillectomy for people with psoriasis.

Psoriasis, a disease which produces scaly pink patches on the skin, often gets worse after a bacterial throat infection or tonsillitis. When someone with psoriasis has a throat infection, antibiotics are sometimes used in an attempt to prevent this from happening. For people with psoriasis and repeated throat infections tonsillectomy is sometimes recommended. The review found no evidence from trials that either antibiotics or tonsillectomy are helpful for people with psoriasis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Tonsillectomy for Obstructive Sleep-Disordered Breathing or Recurrent Throat Infection in Children [Internet]

To systematically review evidence addressing tonsillectomy in children with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing (OSDB) or recurrent throat infections.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: January 2017
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Predicting streptococcal pharyngitis in adults in primary care: A systematic review of the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs and validation of the Centor score.

BACKGROUND: Stratifying patients with a sore throat into the probability of having an underlying bacterial or viral cause may be helpful in targeting antibiotic treatment. We sought to assess the diagnostic accuracy of signs and symptoms and validate a clinical prediction rule (CPR), the Centor score, for predicting group A β-haemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) pharyngitis in adults (> 14 years of age) presenting with sore throat symptoms.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Meta-analysis of trials of streptococcal throat treatment programs to prevent rheumatic fever

The authors concluded that penicillin used in a school or community-based programme resulted in approximately 60% reduction in rheumatic fever cases. Given the unclear quality of the included diverse studies and weaknesses in the analysis, the authors' conclusions should be treated with caution.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Improving Antibiotic Prescribing for Uncomplicated Acute Respiratory Tract Infections [Internet]

To assess the comparative effectiveness of interventions for improving antibiotic use for acute respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in adults and children.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: January 2016
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Effectiveness and safety of short-course vs long-course antibiotic therapy for group a beta-hemolytic streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis: a meta-analysis of randomized trials

The authors concluded that short-course antibiotic treatment for group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis, particularly with penicillin V, was associated with inferior bacteriological eradication rates. The evidence appeared to support the authors’ conclusions, but the generally poor quality of included trials and the restricted search may limit the reliability of the review.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Higher dosages of azithromycin are more effective in treatment of group A streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis

This review determined the optimal dose of azithromycin for treatment of group A streptococcal (GAS) tonsillopharyngitis. The authors concluded that 60 mg/kg azithromycin in children or 3 days of 500 mg/day azithromycin in adults increase GAS eradication and clinical cure. Differences between paediatric studies and inadequate evidence supporting 3-day regimens in adults mean that the authors' conclusions are of doubtful reliability.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Interventions To Improve Antibiotic Prescribing for Uncomplicated Acute Respiratory Tract Infections

This is a summary of a systematic review evaluating the evidence regarding the effectiveness and adverse consequences of strategies for reducing antibiotic use in adults and children with uncomplicated acute respiratory tract infections (RTIs). The systematic review included 133 unique studies published from 1990 to February 2015. The full report, listing all studies, is available at www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/antibiotics-RTI. Although this summary provides a review of evidence, it should not be construed to represent clinical recommendations or guidelines.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Clinicians [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 6, 2016

Respiratory Tract Infections - Antibiotic Prescribing: Prescribing of Antibiotics for Self-Limiting Respiratory Tract Infections in Adults and Children in Primary Care

Respiratory tract infection (RTI) is defined as any infectious disease of the upper or lower respiratory tract. Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) include the common cold, laryngitis, pharyngitis/tonsillitis, acute rhinitis, acute rhinosinusitis and acute otitis media. Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) include acute bronchitis, bronchiolitis, pneumonia and tracheitis. Antibiotics are commonly prescribed for RTIs in adults and children in primary care. General practice consultation rates in England and Wales show that a quarter of the population will visit their GP because of an RTI each year (Ashworth et al. 2005). RTIs are the reason for 60% of all antibiotic prescribing in general practice, and this constitutes a significant cost to the NHS. Annual prescribing costs for acute cough alone exceed £15 million (Lindbaek 2006).

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (UK).

Version: July 2008
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Antenatal Care: Routine Care for the Healthy Pregnant Woman

The original antenatal care guideline was published by NICE in 2003. Since then a number of important pieces of evidence have become available, particularly concerning gestational diabetes, haemoglobinopathy and ultrasound, so that the update was initiated. This update has also provided an opportunity to look at a number of aspects of antenatal care: the development of a method to assess women for whom additional care is necessary (the ‘antenatal assessment tool’), information giving to women, lifestyle (vitamin D supplementation, alcohol consumption), screening for the baby (use of ultrasound for gestational age assessment and screening for fetal abnormalities, methods for determining normal fetal growth, placenta praevia), and screening for the mother (haemoglobinopathy screening, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and preterm labour, chlamydia).

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: March 2008
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Selective testing strategies for diagnosing group A streptococcal infection in children with pharyngitis: a systematic review and prospective multicentre external validation study

BACKGROUND: Several clinical prediction rules for diagnosing group A streptococcal infection in children with pharyngitis are available. We aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of rules-based selective testing strategies in a prospective cohort of children with pharyngitis.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

[Treatment of streptococcal tonsillitis with once-a-day amoxicillin: a meta-analysis]

INTRODUCTION: The objective of this systematic review is to determine if the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis with a daily dose of amoxicillin is similar in effectiveness to other dosing schedules (every 6, 8 or 12 hours) of the same antibiotic or penicillin V.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Meta-analysis of cephalosporin versus penicillin treatment of group A streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis in children

OBJECTIVE: To conduct a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials of cephalosporin versus penicillin treatment of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) tonsillopharyngitis in children.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2004

Rapid diagnostic tests for group A streptococcal pharyngitis: a meta-analysis

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Effective management of group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis is hindered by impracticality of the gold standard diagnostic test: throat culture. Rapid antigen diagnostic tests (RADTs) are a promising alternative, although concerns about their sensitivity and specificity, and variation between test methodologies, have limited their clinical use. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review with meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of RADTs for GAS pharyngitis.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Antibiotics for the primary prevention of acute rheumatic fever: a meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: Rheumatic fever continues to put a significant burden on the health of low socio-economic populations in low and middle-income countries despite the near disappearance of the disease in the developed world over the past century. Antibiotics have long been thought of as an effective method for preventing the onset of acute rheumatic fever following a Group-A streptococcal (GAS) throat infection; however, their use has not been widely adopted in developing countries for the treatment of sore throats. We have used the tools of systematic review and meta-analysis to quantify the effectiveness of antibiotic treatment for sore throat, with symptoms suggestive of group A streptococcal (GAS) infection, for the primary prevention of acute rheumatic fever.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Accuracy and precision of the signs and symptoms of streptococcal pharyngitis in children: a systematic review

OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review to determine whether clinical findings can be used to rule in or to rule out streptococcal pharyngitis in children.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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