Home > Search Results

Results: 1 to 20 of 218

Radiotherapy after surgery for prostate cancer

Surgical removal of the prostate has a high chance of cure when prostate cancer is confined to the prostate. High‐risk features (ie, cancer that has spread through the capsule surrounding the prostate into the nearby seminal vesicles or to the edge of the surgical specimen) found at the time of surgery increase the risk of the cancer recurring. Recurrence of cancer might show up as an abnormal blood test (increased prostate‐specific antigen (PSA)), local recurrence at the site of the prostate, or distant spread (most commonly to bones).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Prostate Cancer: Diagnosis and Treatment

The original Prostate Cancer: Diagnosis and Treatment Guideline published in 2008 was the first clinical guideline produced by the National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (NCC-C); accordingly this is now the first NCC-C clinical guideline to be reviewed and updated. Many areas of the original guideline are unchanged as there is little or no new evidence; other aspects have been completely rewritten. As ever there are still many topics where the research evidence is incomplete or conflicting, and so the Guideline Development Group (GDG) have been required to reach a consensus using the evidence available to them in several areas. In places where it was clear that further work needed to be done, new research recommendations have been made which we hope will be used as the basis for future research work.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: January 2014
Show search results within this document

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy [Internet]

Conduct a systematic literature scan for published data for the treatment of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and provide a broad overview of the current state of SBRT for solid malignant tumors.

Comparative Effectiveness Technical Briefs - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: May 2011
Show search results within this document

Treating Localized Prostate Cancer: A Review of the Research for Adults

This summary will tell you about What localized prostate cancer is Common treatment options for localized prostate cancer (watchful waiting, active surveillance, surgery to remove the prostate gland, radiation therapy, and hormone treatment) What researchers found about how the treatments compare Possible side effects of the treatments Things to talk about with your doctor

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Consumers [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: January 21, 2016

Proton Beam Therapy versus Photon Radiotherapy for Adult and Pediatric Oncology Patients: A Review of the Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness [Internet]

There is much interest in increasing the availability of photon therapy — proton beam therapy (PBT) in Canada, but increased costs, implementation concerns, and unsubstantiated comparative clinical benefit and harms compared to other cancer radiotherapy treatments should be considered. This review will evaluate evidence on the comparative clinical and cost-effectiveness of PBT and photon radiotherapy in adult and pediatric patients requiring radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer.

Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: May 20, 2016
Show search results within this document

Neo‐adjuvant and adjuvant hormone therapy for localised and locally advanced prostate cancer

The management of early prostate cancer is one of the most controversial areas in the field of cancer medicine with surgery, radiotherapy, primary hormonal therapy (achieved either by medication or by the surgical removal of the testes ‐ orchidectomy) and watchful waiting, all being acceptable forms of initial treatment. Treatment decision making is often based on patient and provider preferences taking into account the risks and benefits of therapies and disease progression. Since prostate cancer is driven, in part by male sex hormones, the use of hormonal treatment to reduce the level of circulating male hormones is a potentially very useful method of treating all stages of this disease. Recently, research on the use of such hormonal therapy in combination with both surgery and radiotherapy has increased. This systematic review combines the results of all the important trials looking at the role of hormones in combination with surgery and radiotherapy for localised and locally advanced prostate cancer.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Interstitial brachytherapy in localised prostate cancer: Executive summary of final report N04-02, Version 1.0

The aim of this review was the evaluation of benefits and harms of low-dose-rate permanent interstitial brachytherapy in localised prostate cancer compared with standard surgical procedures, percutaneous radiotherapy, and watchful waiting. The focus of the evaluation was on patient-relevant therapy goals. Moreover, substantially different types of brachytherapy were to be compared with each other.

Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care: Executive Summaries [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: January 17, 2007

EOS 2D/3D X-ray Imaging System: A Systematic Review and Economic Evaluation

EOS is a biplane X-ray imaging system manufactured by EOS Imaging (formerly Biospace Med, Paris, France). It uses slot-scanning technology to produce a high-quality image with less irradiation than standard imaging techniques.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: March 2012
Show search results within this document

Systematic Review and Economic Modelling of the Relative Clinical Benefit and Cost-Effectiveness of Laparoscopic Surgery and Robotic Surgery for Removal of the Prostate in Men with Localised Prostate Cancer

Complete surgical removal of the prostate, radical prostatectomy, is the most frequently used treatment option for men with localised prostate cancer. The use of laparoscopic (keyhole) and robot-assisted surgery has improved operative safety but the comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of these options remains uncertain.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: November 2012
Show search results within this document

Hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy (HEBRT) versus conventional external-beam radiation (CEBRT) in patients with localized prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this work was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of all randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy and side effect profile of hypofractionated versus conventional external-beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Starting androgen suppression (hormone) therapy early, before advanced prostate cancer starts progressing may improve chances of longer survival.

The prostate gland is part of the male sex gland and is a common site of cancer in older men. Treatments for prostate cancer include surgery and radiation therapy. Male hormones (androgens) stimulate prostate cancer growth. Hormone suppression therapy, decreasing the levels of these hormones, is therefore also used to try to treat prostate cancer. It is not clear however whether it is better to start hormone treatment straight after diagnosis, or to wait until the disease progresses. The review found that early hormone suppression treatment decreased the progression of advanced prostate cancer and improved survival. Further studies are needed.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Prostate cancer: Overview

Prostate cancer is a malignant tumor in the prostate, a gland that is part of the male internal reproductive system. The prostate is a gland about the size of a chestnut, and is located between the bladder and the pelvic floor muscles.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: March 28, 2013

Chemotherapy for men with prostate cancer who have not responded to hormone therapy

Men with advanced prostate cancer and painful bone metastases are a difficult group of patients to treat. Data from recent randomised trials of chemotherapy suggest an improvement in overall survival, pain relief, and quality of life with this form of therapy. Side effects are common and can be severe. Chemotherapy offers a treatment option for men with hormone‐refractory prostate cancer (HRPC), but the decision to treat should be carefully considered by the patient and clinician. More studies are needed to find new and better agents.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Interstitial brachytherapy in localized prostate cancer – Update: Executive summary of final report N10-01, Version 1.0

The aim of the present research is to answer the question as to whether the literature published on low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (BT) in localized prostate cancer since the search conducted for the original final report N04-02 results in a change in the conclusions of the final report for the individual procedures to be analysed. (The search for and assessment of the new literature was to follow the same methodology used in the original report.)

Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care: Executive Summaries [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: December 13, 2010

PSA tests for prostate cancer screening

Men’s opinions on prostate cancer screening vary greatly: Some prefer not to think about it at all, while others want to take every opportunity to try to prevent prostate cancer. Either way, anyone looking into the topic of prostate cancer screening will come across conflicting information and advice, and that can make it harder to decide whether or not to be screened.The confusion starts with the various ways the examinations are talked about. Screening is sometimes referred to as prostate cancer prevention, which can give you the impression that screening can keep you from developing cancer. But none of the examinations currently offered can do that. The goal of screening is to detect prostate cancer as early as possible in the hope of increasing the chances of successful treatment.Prostate cancer is different in different men: Sometimes it grows so slowly that no treatment is needed. But it can also be aggressive, cause problems or even become life-threatening. Fortunately, most prostate cancer tumors are the slow-growing type.The only screening test for prostate cancer that has been investigated in larger studies is the PSA test. This test is designed to detect prostate cancer before it starts causing symptoms, and in turn give men better treatment options and increase their life expectancy. But PSA testing is a controversial issue. As with any screening test, the results of PSA tests are sometimes wrong, and there are some clear disadvantages too. So it is worth carefully weighing the pros and cons of the test before deciding on whether or not to have it.In Germany, PSA tests for prostate cancer screening are not covered by statutory health insurers. But many doctors offer the test as an individual health care service, which need to be paid out of pocket. The test costs about 15 to 20 euros. Because it involves a consultation and other related tests it often ends up costing around 50 euros.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: January 28, 2015

Therapies for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

This is a summary of a systematic review update evaluating the current evidence regarding the comparative effectiveness and harms of treatment options for clinically localized prostate cancer. The systematic review included 61 articles reporting on 52 eligible studies published from January 1, 2007, through March 7, 2014. The full report, listing all studies, is available at www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate-cancer. This summary is provided to assist in informed clinical decisionmaking. However, reviews of evidence should not be construed to represent clinical recommendations or guidelines.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Clinicians [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: January 21, 2016

Treatments for Localized Prostate Cancer: Systematic Review to Update the 2002 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation [Internet]

Screening with prostate-specific antigen testing can detect prostate cancer in earlier, asymptomatic stages, when treatments might be more effective. However, treatments for prostate cancer are also associated with potential harms.

Evidence Syntheses - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: October 2011
Show search results within this document

The Management of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Men [Internet]

The guideline covers men (18 and over) with a clinical working diagnosis of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Options for conservative, pharmacological, surgical, and complementary or alternative treatments are considered in terms of clinical and cost effectiveness.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: 2010
Show search results within this document

Particle Beam Radiation Therapies for Cancer [Internet]

Radiotherapy with charged particles can potentially deliver maximal doses while minimizing irradiation of surrounding tissues. It may be more effective or less harmful than other forms of radiotherapy for some cancers. Currently, seven centers in the United States have facilities for particle (proton) irradiation, and at least four are under construction, each costing between $100 and $225 million. The aim of this Technical Brief was to survey the evidence on particle beam radiotherapy.

Comparative Effectiveness Technical Briefs - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: November 2009
Show search results within this document

Advanced Breast Cancer: Diagnosis and Treatment

Breast cancer is the most common cancer for women in England and Wales, with about 37,000 new cases diagnosed and 11,000 deaths recorded in England and Wales each year. In men breast cancer is rare, with about 270 cases diagnosed, and 70 deaths in England and Wales each year. Of these new cases in women and men, around 10% are diagnosed in the advanced stages, when the tumour has spread significantly within the breast or to other organs of the body. In addition, there is a significant number of women who have been previously treated with curative intent who subsequently develop either a local recurrence or metastases. Over recent years there have been important developments in the investigation and management of these patients including new chemotherapy, and biological and hormonal agents. There is some evidence of practice variation across the country and of patchy availability of certain treatments and procedures. A clinical guideline will help to address these issues and offer guidance on best practice.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: February 2009
Show search results within this document

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (29)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...