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Varicose veins: What are the outcomes of surgery?

There are different types of surgery for getting rid of varicose veins and relieving their symptoms. But sometimes varicose veins develop again afterwards.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: July 13, 2016

Surgery versus sclerotherapy for the treatment of varicose veins

Sclerotherapy (injection of a substance into the vein) shows greater benefits than surgery in the short term but surgery has greater benefits in the longer term. Varicose veins are a relatively common problem. Two treatments available are surgery and sclerotherapy. Both involve removal of the vein either by stripping it out (surgery) or by injecting it with a solution that causes it to collapse and be absorbed into the surrounding tissues (sclerotherapy). Neither treatment adversely affects blood flow through the limb. This review found that sclerotherapy was better than surgery in terms of treatment success, complication rate and cost at one year, but surgery was better after five years. However, the evidence was not of very good quality and more research is needed.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Varicose veins: Surgical and non-surgical treatment options

Many people who have varicose veins use compression stockings. If this doesn't provide enough symptom relief, the varicose veins can be surgically removed. Smaller varicose veins can be treated with sclerotherapy.Most people who have varicose veins try to manage the symptoms by wearing compression stockings. These special stockings are meant to help the veins transport blood by applying pressure to them. If wearing compression stockings doesn't relieve the symptoms enough, surgical procedures may be considered.Varicose veins can be surgically removed or closed off using a number of different techniques. Removing these veins doesn't affect the blood supply to the legs because the blood is then "re-directed" and transported by other, healthy veins instead.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: July 13, 2016

Varicose veins: Overview

About one in five adults have varicose veins. These bumpy, bluish veins are mostly a cosmetic issue for a lot of people. But they sometimes cause heavy-feeling legs, pain or muscle cramps. Read about the treatment options for varicose veins.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: July 13, 2016

Endovenous ablation (radiofrequency and laser) and foam sclerotherapy versus open surgery for varicose veins

Varicose veins are dilated, tortuous superficial veins. When they are in the legs they can be painful, itchy or unsightly, especially when patients are standing and walking. Varicose veins are conventionally treated with surgery to remove the veins, by stripping them to the level of the knee (so‐called high ligation and stripping). New less invasive treatments seal the main leaking vein in the thigh using foam sclerotherapy, laser (endovenous laser therapy) or radiofrequency ablation. These techniques may result in less pain after the procedure, fewer complications, and a quicker return to work and normal activities with improved patient quality of life, as well as avoiding the need for a general anaesthetic.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

CHIVA method for the treatment of varicose veins

Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is a disorder in which veins fail to pump blood back to the heart adequately. It can cause varicose veins, skin ulcers, and superficial or deep vein thrombosis in the legs. The ambulatory conservative hemodynamic correction of venous insufficiency (CHIVA) method is a minimally invasive surgical technique to treat varicose veins. The aim of the CHIVA treatment is to eliminate the venous‐venous shunts by disconnecting the escape points, preserving the saphenous vein and normal venous drainage of the superficial tissues of the limb.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

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