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Results: 7

Steroid implants for chronic uveitis not caused by infection

Uveitis describes a group of eye diseases caused by inflammation (redness and swelling, etc.). Uveitis is the fifth most common cause of vision loss in high‐income countries, accounting for 5% (1 in 20 cases) to 20% (1 in 5 cases) of blindness, with the disease affecting mostly working‐age people. In low‐income countries, uveitis accounts for 2.4% (1 in 40 cases) to 24% (1 in 4 cases) of legal blindness. These figures are for all types of uveitis (infectious and non‐infectious uveitis), so the prevalence of non‐infectious uveitis (the focus of this review) is likely lower than these estimates.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Comparison of artificial lenses placed in eyes with uveitis during cataract surgery

Cataract, a cloudy lens within the eye, is a major complication in people with uveitis (inflammation of the middle layer of the eye). Different types of artificial lenses (intraocular lenses, IOLs) are available to insert into the eye after removal of the cloudy natural lens during cataract surgery. The purpose of this review is to summarize the effects of different artificial lenses in adults with uveitis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Rifabutin for treating pulmonary tuberculosis

Among current challenges in tuberculosis treatment are reducing the length of time that drugs must be taken to less than six months and finding ways to safely combine tuberculosis drugs with those used in the treatment of HIV infection. Rifabutin is a drug that has the potential to address these issues if substituted for rifampicin, a mainstay of current treatment. This review identified five trials involving 924 people, but none were of high quality. The review found no significant differences between rifabutin‐ and rifampicin‐containing treatment in curing tuberculosis and preventing relapse, but higher doses of rifabutin might be associated with more adverse effects and there was no evidence that it could shorten treatment. However, very few people with HIV and tuberculosis, who are most likely to benefit from use of rifabutin due to its lack of interaction with antiretroviral drugs, were included in the trials. Better quality clinical trials are needed to understand the place of rifabutin in the treatment of people with tuberculosis, particularly those who also have HIV.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD): Drug therapy for wet AMD

Unlike the dry type of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), wet AMD can be effectively treated using medication. There are a number of different drugs that can help to improve vision at least temporarily or to keep it from worsening for a longer time.In wet AMD new blood vessels grow underneath the retina and into it, lifting it up. These vessels may leak blood and other fluid into the retina, damaging the part of the eye we use for our central vision.Three medications known as anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) drugs have been approved for the treatment of wet AMD:Ranibizumab (trade name: Lucentis)Aflibercept (trade name: Eylea)Pegaptanib (trade name: Macugen)Pegaptanib is hardly ever used anymore because it is less effective than the other drugs. In Germany, for example, it is no longer available.The drug bevacizumab (Avastin) is also an option, although it is approved for cancer therapies, and not the treatment of AMD. It can be prescribed off-label by a doctor (see final section below).All four medications work on a similar principle: They block specific growth factors that are responsible for the growth of abnormal blood vessels into the eye. Drug therapy aims to slow down the progression of AMD or to at least temporarily stop it.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: July 29, 2015

Valacyclovir compared with acyclovir for the treatment of herpes zoster ophthalmicus in people with an otherwise normal immune system

The aim of this Cochrane Review was to find out if valacyclovir performs better than acyclovir in the treatment of a painful itchy rash caused by the chickenpox virus (herpes zoster ophthalmicus). Cochrane researchers collected and analysed all relevant studies to answer this question and found one study.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA)

In this Cochrane review of the effect of NSAIDs for people with axSpA (including ankylosing spondylitis and non‐radiographic (nr‐)axSpA), we included 39 studies with 4356 people (search up to 18 June 2014). One study looked at people with nr‐axSpA.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Prophylactic non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the prevention of macular oedema after cataract surgery

The aim of this Cochrane Review was to find out if NSAID eye drops can prevent a sight‐threatening complication of cataract surgery (swelling at the back of the eye, known as macular oedema). Cochrane researchers collected and analysed all relevant studies to answer this question and found 34 studies.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

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