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Pharmacological treatments for psychosis‐related polydipsia

Schizophrenia is a serious, chronic and relapsing mental illness with a worldwide lifetime prevalence of about one percent. An uncommon but serious complication of psychotic illness is polydipsia, the intake of more than three litres of fluids per day. Although the exact reason for any one person developing polydipsia is unclear, effective treatment is essential as if untreated, such a high intake of fluids can lead to hyponatraemia which in turn can lead to coma or even death. It is estimated that between 6% and 17% of psychiatric inpatients suffer from polydipsia, and even if this is an over estimate it is a common and serious enough condition to merit clinical concern.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Lifestyle interventions for the treatment of urinary incontinence in adults

Urinary incontinence imposes a considerable burden on individuals and on society. Although a range of treatments is available, alterations in lifestyle are frequently recommended for the treatment of urinary incontinence, as they are relatively low in cost and have few unwanted side‐effects. Advice commonly given includes losing weight, changes in diet, adjusting volume of fluid intake, decreasing caffeine or alcohol consumption, avoiding constipation and straining (when passing faeces), stopping smoking, and being more physically active ‐ though restricting excessive heavy activity.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Screening for gestational diabetes and subsequent management for improving maternal and infant health

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a form of diabetes that can develop during pregnancy. Having GDM increases the risk of complications during the rest of the pregnancy for the mother and her baby. Women with GDM are more likely to develop pre‐eclampsia (high blood pressure and protein in the urine) and require a caesarean section. For the baby, potential problems include the baby growing larger than it normally would, causing difficulties with birth. The baby can also have low blood sugar levels after birth. Although GDM usually resolves following birth, both mother and child are at risk of developing type II diabetes in the future. There is strong evidence that treating GDM is beneficial and improves health outcomes.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Prostate Cancer, Nutrition, and Dietary Supplements (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of nutrition and dietary supplements for reducing the risk of developing prostate cancer or for treating prostate cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: June 9, 2017

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