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About - Risperidone

By mouth: Treats schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and irritability caused by autistic disorder.

By injection: Treats schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

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No studies involving risperidone were identified which randomly assigned treatment for long‐term relapse prevention. Trials involving random assignment of risperidone and other treatments for long‐term treatment are needed.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Risperidone is an antipsychotic medication that has been used for symptom relief and behavioural improvement in autism. This review encompasses three randomised controlled trials and concludes that risperidone may be beneficial for various aspects of autism including irritability, repetition and hyperactivity. However, all studies were relatively small and used different ways to assess effectiveness, making comparisons difficult. In addition, side effects were identified, notably weight gain. Further studies are therefore necessary to determine the long term benefits, if any, compared with the potential risks.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Attention‐deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is more common in people with intellectual disability than in the general population.  As in the general population, ADHD adversely affects the ability to learn and is associated with behavioural disturbance, and therefore any intervention to reduce these symptoms is important.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

This review included six trials and investigated the efficacy and tolerability of risperidone, an atypical antipsychotic, as treatment for mania compared to placebo or other medicines. High withdrawal rates from the trials limit the confidence that can be placed on the results. Risperidone, both as monotherapy and combined with lithium, or an anticonvulsant, was more effective at reducing manic symptoms than placebo but caused more weight gain, sedation and elevation of prolactin levels. The efficacy of risperidone was comparable to that of haloperidol both as monotherapy and as adjunctive treatments to lithium, or an anticonvulsant. Risperidone caused less movement disorders than haloperidol but there was some evidence for greater weight gain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Risperidone is one of the most widely used new generation of antipsychotic drugs. This review summarises its effects compared with the older antipsychotics. In essence, risperidone may be equally clinically effective to relatively high doses of haloperidol, for an outcome that is difficult to interpret as clinically meaningful. Risperidone causes less adverse effects than the side‐effect prone haloperidol.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Schizophrenia is a debilitating mental illness that affects about one percent of the population worldwide.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

This review examines the effects of risperidone compared to other second‐generation antipsychotic (SGA) drugs for schizophrenia. We identified 45 relevant studies with 7760 participants comparing risperidone with amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, sertindole and ziprasidone. Comparisons of risperidone with zotepine are currently not available. Risperidone was somewhat more successful than quetiapine and ziprasidone, but somewhat less successful than clozapine and olanzapine. The main disadvantage of risperidone were more frequent movement disorders and more prolactin increase compared to most other SGA drugs.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

People with schizophrenia often hear voices and see things (hallucinations) and have strange beliefs (delusions). These are called ‘positive symptoms’. Mental illness also causes tiredness, apathy, emotional numbness, and withdrawal. These are called ‘negative symptoms’. The main treatment for the symptoms of schizophrenia are antipsychotic drugs. Antipsychotic drugs can be classified into typical (older) and atypical (newer) drugs. Typical antipsychotics such as chlorpromazine and haloperidol have been the mainstay of treatment for decades, and have been effective in reducing the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. Negative symptoms, however, have been fairly resistant to treatment. In addition, drug treatments are associated with unpleasant side effects that cause people to stop taking medication, which may lead to relapse. It is thought that newer atypical antipsychotics, such as risperidone, are more effective than the older antipsychotics as they reduce the positive symptoms but cause fewer side effects.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2017

Schizophrenia is a serious mental illness which, for some people can become a long term problem. The usual first line treatment for schizophrenia is antipsychotic medication. However, because of the adverse effects these drugs can have, over time those taking them try to find a dose where they are gaining the most therapeutic benefit for the least amount of medication and doctors will often support them to do this. Conversely, for those whose illness does not respond well to medication, high doses are often used. This can cause severe adverse effects and can set up a cycle where individuals gain some benefit from the medication, develop side effects, then stop taking it and relapse. Therefore it would be helpful to find the optimum dose of each antipsychotic for different groups of people.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Risperidone is a newer antipsychotic drug that was the first available as a long‐lasting injection (a depot injection). The review examines the clinical effects of depot risperidone for people with schizophrenia.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Schizophrenia is a chronic mental illness that requires lifelong treatment., Patients with schizophrenia are at an increased risk for numerous other medical illnesses, including suicide. In Canada, the disease affects about 1% of the population, or about 234,000 people (2004 data). Antipsychotic medications form the cornerstone of treatment for schizophrenia., Existing antipsychotic therapies fall into one of two classes: typical antipsychotics (TAP) and atypical antipsychotics (AAP). Both classes are considered equally effective in the treatment of positive symptoms. AAPs appear to be more effective in the treatment of negative symptoms. TAPs are associated with an increased incidence of adverse events (AEs) known as extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS); however, AAPs are associated with an increased risk of weight gain and metabolic AEs.

Common Drug Review - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: February 2017

For many antipsychotics, dose-response relationships remain poorly understood. High dose treatment remains commonplace. We aimed to establish the dose-response relationship for oral risperidone in relapsed schizophrenia. We searched the known medical literature for fixed-dose studies of oral risperidone in this patient group. Data recovered were used to construct graphs of dose versus response. Eighteen reports evaluating the efficacy of oral risperidone were retrieved. Three studies used fixed doses of oral risperidone for eight weeks in relapsed schizophrenia. The data from these studies were included. Graphs plotted using these data strongly suggest that doses of around 4 mg daily are optimal. A dose of 2 mg daily consistently produced a lower level of efficacy. Doses of 6 mg or greater produced no additional benefit and doses tend to be less efficacious at 10mg daily and above. Frequency of extrapyramidal adverse effects increased with dose. The optimal dose of risperidone in relapsed schizophrenia is 4 mg daily. Higher doses are unlikely to improve efficacy and may reduce it. Adverse movement disorders become more common.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2006

This study aims to review the evidence for the efficacy of risperidone in the treatment of disruptive behavioural disorders (DBDs) in children and adolescents. Established databases were searched using the terms 'Risperidone and efficacy and children' and 'Risperidone and efficacy and adolescents'. Randomised, double-blind controlled studies were retained for analysis. Janseen-Cilag was contacted to identify any unpublished studies. Quality of studies was measured using Jadad scores. Seven studies of 657 subjects with a mean age of 9.9 years (SD= 2.0) (range 4-18 years) were identified. Only one study was judged to use the highest quality of methodology according to the Jadad score. Patients with DBD who were treated with risperidone showed clinical improvement compared with placebo. Weight gain, somnolence and gastrointestinal complaints were common. Risperidone was found to be efficacious in reducing symptoms in children and adolescents with DBD. However, studies were mostly of short duration and had deficiencies in the descriptions of blinding and randomisation. Research using rigorous methodology examining the long-term outcomes of efficacy and safety are required to inform clinicians and families of the therapeutic benefits and risks of risperidone in this clinical population.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

This review compared the effects of amisulpride with those of other so called second generation (atypical) antipsychotic drugs. For half of the possible comparisons not a single relevant study could be identified. Based on very limited data there was no difference in efficacy comparing amisulpride with olanzapine and risperidone, but a certain advantage compared with ziprasidone. Amisulpride was associated with less weight gain than risperidone and olanzapine.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

A new generation of antipsychotics, drugs such as olanzapine and risperidone are recommended for people with a first episode of schizophrenia. Currently, the quality of information is too limited to come to any firm conclusions. A number of ongoing studies should provide more and better information in the near future.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

This review compares the effects of zotepine to other second generation antipsychotic drugs. Three trials suggest that the efficacy of zotepine may be comparable to risperidone and remoxipride. The evidence base is insufficient to provide firm conclusions as to whether zotepine is as effective or less effective than clozapine. The movement disorders and the cognitive changes appear to be similar to clozapine, risperidone and remoxipride. The need for antiparkinson medication is similar to risperidone and remoxipride, but may be associated with increased need than necessary with clozapine.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Anxiety disorders are a prevalent and disabling condition. Because of high rates of treatment resistance, there is interest in new pharmacological treatment options such as second‐generation antipsychotics. This systematic review evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of second‐generation antipsychotics in the treatment of anxiety disorders. We found eleven randomised placebo‐controlled trials, comparing quetiapine, olanzapine and risperidone with placebo and antidepressants. The vast majority of the available data was on quetiapine (> 3000 participants). Participants with generalised anxiety disorder responded significantly better to quetiapine than to placebo, measured as a reduction in the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM‐A). Participants treated with quetiapine were more likely to drop out due to adverse events, to gain weight, to suffer from sedation or to suffer from extrapyramidal side effects. The evidence on the other second‐generation antipsychotics is currently too limited to draw any conclusions.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

This review found some trials comparing the effects of adding second‐generation antipsychotic drugs or placebo to antidepressants in obsessive compulsive disorder. There were only 11 trials on three second‐generation antipsychotic drugs (olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone). While not much can be said about olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone showed some efficacy benefit, but also adverse effects.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Pimozide is a well‐studied drug used to treat the tics (uncontrolled movements and noises) caused by Tourette Syndrome.  There are concerns about side effects associated with pimozide, so it would be helpful to know how it compares to other drugs, and newer drugs.  The review authors searched the medical literature for clinical trials that compared pimozide to other drugs, or a dummy drug (placebo), for treating tics in patients with Tourette Syndrome. The trials identified showed that pimozide was more effective at reducing tics than placebo.  It was slightly less effective than the drug haloperidol, but showed fewer side effects. There were no important differences between pimozide and risperidone for either reduction of tics or side effects. In future, if trials could be run for longer, it would help the investigation of the nature of side effects caused by these drugs.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Paliperidone, 9‐hydroxy‐risperidone, is an active metabolite of risperidone that is now commercially available in an oral formulation. We evaluated the efficacy, adverse effects, and safety of oral paliperidone in the treatment of people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia‐like illnesses. In short‐term studies, oral paliperidone is a more effective antipsychotic than placebo. The adverse effects of paliperidone are similar to those of risperidone. No data comparing the efficacy of paliperidone to risperidone over a meaningful period of time was available for this review; in a six‐day trial comparing paliperidone to risperidone we identified no difference in recurrence of psychotic symptoms or adverse effects. The manufacturer is also developing an intramuscular long‐acting formulation, but it is not yet commercially available; its use in the treatment of schizophrenia will be considered in a separate review.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

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