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Interventions for treating psoriatic arthritis

It has been estimated that arthritis occurs in 5‐7 % of those with psoriasis, which can cause substantial disability in some patients.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs, including aspirin and paracetamol (acetaminophen) in people taking methotrexate for inflammatory arthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review describes what we know from research about any safety issues from using non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, including aspirin, or paracetamol (acetaminophen), or both, along with methotrexate in people with inflammatory arthritis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Combining two or more drugs vs one drug for pain control in inflammatory arthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of a combination of two pain relieving drugs for pain control in inflammatory arthritis (IA).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Pain in patients with inflammatory arthritis and gastrointestinal or liver problems

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of pain relieving drugs for people with inflammatory arthritis plus stomach or gut disease, or liver disease.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Non‐drug interventions for helping workers with inflammatory arthritis stay at work

Inflammatory arthritis (IA), also called rheumatism, is a group of diseases that cause long‐lasting pain, stiffness and swelling in the joints. These symptoms make it difficult to move and make you feel tired, which in turn can make it difficult to work. The most common types of IA are: rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. Worldwide about 3% of people have IA. The disease usually begins when people are between 30 to 40 years old, at a time when they still have many years of working life left. Therefore, it is important to know if there are effective ways in which we can help people with IA stay at work. This Cochrane Review focuses on non‐drug interventions.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Apremilast (Otezla) for psoriasis: Overview

Apremilast (trade name: Otezla) has been approved since January 2015 for psoriasis in adults. It is an option for two clinical types of psoriasis.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: May 15, 2015

Secukinumab (Cosentyx) for psoriasis: Overview

Secukinumab (trade name: Cosentyx) has been approved since 2015 for the treatment of psoriasis in adults.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: April 21, 2016

Oral fumaric acid esters for the treatment of psoriasis

Psoriasis is a long‐term inflammatory skin condition that can markedly reduce the quality of life of affected individuals. Treatments taken by mouth (oral treatments), such as methotrexate, ciclosporin, and acitretin, are commonly prescribed to people with moderate to severe psoriasis. Oral fumaric acid esters (FAE) are licensed for the treatment of psoriasis in Germany but remain unlicensed in most other countries. This means that there are different treatment options offered to people in different countries.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2017

Psoriasis: Overview

First off: psoriasis is not contagious. Typical symptoms include clearly defined red, scaly patches of skin, often accompanied by itching. This condition typically starts in adulthood, and comes and goes in cycles of flare-ups and symptom-free phases. There are many treatment options.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: July 31, 2013

Treatments for nail psoriasis

Psoriasis is a common chronic skin disease with a prevalence in 2% to 3% of the population, according to European studies. Involvement of the nails occurs in about 50%. Nail psoriasis is difficult to treat, but may respond to some treatments. We aimed to review the efficacy and safety of the treatments used for nail psoriasis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Narrow‐band ultraviolet B phototherapy versus broad‐band ultraviolet B or psoralen ultraviolet A photochemotherapy for treating psoriasis

Psoriasis is a common, chronic inflammatory skin disease, with an estimated global prevalence ranging from 0.5% to 4.6%. Based on clinical features, psoriasis is generally divided into the following: chronic plaque psoriasis (CPP); psoriasis associated with psoriatic arthritis; and pustular, erythrodermic, or guttate psoriasis. We also considered psoriasis affecting the palms and soles (palmoplantar psoriasis, or PPP). Although psoriasis is rarely life‐threatening, it can affect a person's quality of life significantly.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

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