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Premenstrual syndrome: Treating PMS symptoms

Some women who have premenstrual syndrome (PMS) have such bad symptoms in the days before their period that it keeps them from doing the things they usually do. But there are different ways of coping with and treating typical symptoms such as pain, breast tenderness and mood swings.Most women who get PMS do not have very severe symptoms, and they have found ways of coping with them – like getting enough rest and avoiding stress around that time of the month. There is a lot of advice out there about how to deal with PMS symptoms, including:regularly getting enough sleep,doing exercise and sports,using relaxation techniques and meditating,not smoking,drinking less alcohol and caffeine,eating food that is low in carbohydrates and/or salt.Most of these things have not been put to the test in high-quality scientific studies. But that does not mean that they cannot help. Women can try them out themselves and see whether making these changes helps relieve their symptoms. If you are going to try one of these things, keeping a diary might help. Observing and recording symptoms and attempted "remedies" over the course of several menstrual cycles can help you find out whether the changes have affected the symptoms.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: July 13, 2013

Premenstrual syndrome: Overview

The days leading up to menstrual periods are sometimes a mystery to women too: Out of the blue, women with premenstrual syndrome (PMS) feel depressed, irritable, find it hard to concentrate, or cry easily. There are different ways to cope with these symptoms.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: June 19, 2013

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for premenstrual syndrome

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a common cause of physical, psychological and social problems in women of reproductive age. PMS is distinguished from 'normal' premenstrual symptoms by the degree of distress and disruption it causes. Symptoms occur during the period leading up to the menstrual period and are relieved by the onset of menstruation. Common symptoms include irritability, depression, anxiety and lethargy. A clinical diagnosis of PMS requires that the symptoms are confirmed by prospective recording (that is recorded as they occur) for at least two menstrual cycles and that they cause substantial distress or impairment to daily life. It is estimated that approximately one in five women of reproductive age are affected. PMS can severely disrupt a woman's daily life and some women seek medical treatment. Researchers in The Cochrane Collaboration reviewed the evidence about the effectiveness and safety of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for treating PMS. They examined the research up to February 2013.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Birth control pills with drospirenone for treating premenstrual syndrome

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a common problem. A severe form is called premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Birth control pills with the hormones progestin and estrogen have been studied for treating such symptoms. A birth control pill with the progestin drospirenone may work better than other such pills. A drospirenone pill with low estrogen was approved for treating PMDD, the severe form of PMS, in women who use birth control pills.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

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