Home > Search Results

Results: 1 to 20 of 39

Clear

More research is needed to determine whether using frozen embryos and or intravenous albumin can reduce the rate of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in IVF. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) is a complication of using hormones to induce ovulation (stimulate the release of eggs) in IVF (in vitro fertilisation). The drugs can sometimes over‐stimulate ovaries. Severe OHSS can be life‐threatening. Fewer hormones are needed if frozen embryos are transferred in a subsequent cycle, although this lowers pregnancy rates. However, this update the review first published in 2002 (D'Angelo 2002) found there is not enough evidence to show whether using frozen embryos and or intravenous albumin infusion (artificial fluid to increase the woman's blood volume) can reduce OHSS in women who are at high risk. More research is needed on effects on pregnancy rates.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: July 18, 2007

This overview of Cochrane reviews aims to identify and summarise all evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on interventions that could prevent or treat moderate, severe and overall ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) in couples with subfertility who are undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles (i.e. in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: January 23, 2017

Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome undergoing conventional assisted reproduction techniques are at an increased risk of ovarian hyperstimulation. Since polycystic ovarian syndrome is often associated with the retrieval of immature oocytes, poor fertilisation, and low pregnancy rates, women with polycystic ovarian syndrome undergoing conventional assisted reproduction techniques are at an increased risk of ovarian hyperstimulation. Thus, these women might benefit from the earlier retrieval of oocytes followed by maturation of the oocytes in the laboratory (in vitro maturation ‐ IVM) as this would reduce the aforementioned risks. However, while successful fertilisation, embryo development, and term pregnancies resulting from IVM oocytes have been reported, along with some concern has been expressed regarding the safety of the method with respect to the health of the children and the rate of congenital anomalies. We reviewed the evidence up to May 2013.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: October 8, 2013

Researchers in the Cochrane Collaboration reviewed the evidence on different types of volume expanders in women at high risk of OHSS undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation as part of any assisted reproductive technique (ART). Women with very high estradiol levels, high numbers of follicles or oocytes retrieved, and women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), are at particularly high risk of developing OHSS.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: August 31, 2016

OHSS occurs because of overstimulation of the ovaries (female reproductive organs that produce eggs and sex hormones) in fertility treatment (called assisted reproductive technology). It is characterised by enlarged ovaries and movement of fluid from the blood vessels to other body cavities, resulting in abdominal (stomach) bloating, increased risk of blood clots and a reduction in the blood supply to important organs. In most cases, the condition is mild and resolves itself without treatment, but some women develop a moderate or severe form of OHSS, which requires hospitalisation. There is no cure for OHSS other than waiting for it to settle down and reducing symptoms while in hospital. Medicines called dopamine agonists have been introduced to try and prevent OHSS.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: November 30, 2016

To assess the effect of withholding gonadotrophins (coasting) to prevent ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in assisted reproduction cycles.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: May 23, 2017

To compare the effectiveness and safety of gonadotrophins as a second‐line treatment to stimulate ovulation in women with PCOS who do not respond to clomiphene citrate (CC).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: September 9, 2015

This updated Cochrane review evaluated the efficacy and safety of GnRH antagonists compared to the more widely‐used GnRH agonists (long‐course protocol).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: April 29, 2016

Review question: To determine whether in vitro fertilisation (IVF) in a natural cycle is a good alternative to standard IVF for subfertile couples.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: August 30, 2013

We reviewed the evidence on the effects of GnRH agonists on final oocyte maturation triggering in GnRH antagonist IVF/ICSI treatment cycles.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: October 31, 2014

The aim of this review was to compare treatment with clomiphene citrate (CC) or letrozole (Ltz) versus gonadotropins alone for stimulation of the ovaries during in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: November 2, 2017

As many as one in six couples encounter problems with fertility, defined as failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after regular intercourse for 12 months. Increasingly, couples are turning to assisted reproductive technology (ART) for help with conceiving and ultimately giving birth to a healthy live baby of their own. Fertility treatments are complex and costly, and each assisted reproduction cycle consists of several steps. If one of the steps is incorrectly applied, the stakes are high as conception may not occur. With this in mind, it is important that each step involved in ART is supported by good evidence from well‐designed studies. Cochrane reviewers examined the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on ART published in The Cochrane Library.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: July 15, 2015

Many different interventions, dosages and administration routes of luteal phase support have been investigated. We made seven different comparisons to prepare a complete overview of this topic.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: July 7, 2015

Review question: can ultrasound alone be used safely without adding estradiol blood test measurements to monitor women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation during IVF and ICSI? We reviewed the evidence on monitoring women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation as part of IVF or ICSI by transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) only versus traditional combined monitoring (TVUS) and blood hormone (estradiol) levels.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: August 24, 2014

Endometriomata are a form of ovarian endometriosis, classified as cysts within the ovaries. They are a common cause of subfertility and pelvic pain. This review aimed to determine which treatment approach was better for women with subfertility and endometriomata who were undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART). Four trials were identified. A gonadotropin‐releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist showed a positive treatment effect on the ovarian response to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) and the number of mature oocytes retrieved compared to GnRH antagonist. The evidence for surgery was limited but aspiration was associated with a greater ovarian response than expectant management (a wait and see approach). Further randomised controlled trials of interventions for the management of endometrioma in women undergoing ART are required.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: November 10, 2010

We reviewed the evidence about the effect of Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) on rates of live birth pregnancy and adverse events in subfertile women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: October 12, 2016

Cochrane researchers reviewed the evidence about the effect of ovarian surgery on symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We found 22 studies that compared it to surgical and non‐surgical treatments, and variations of surgical technique. The main outcomes measured were improvement in the regularity of periods, and a decrease in unwanted hair growth and acne (androgenic symptoms). We also looked at harms from treatment, change in body weight, change in testosterone levels, changes in metabolic measures and quality of life.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: November 10, 2017

In natural ovarian cycles, luteinizing hormone and follicle‐stimulating hormone (FSH) are necessary for the maturation of ovarian follicles. One of the various stimulation regimens in IVF or ICSI cycles is ovarian stimulation with rFSH in combination with a gonadotrophin‐releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. GnRH analogues prevent premature luteinizing hormone surges. Since they deprive the growing follicles of luteinizing hormone, the question arises as to whether supplementation with recombinant luteinizing hormone (rLH) would increase live birth rates.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: May 24, 2017

In planning an IVF cycle, doctors often decide the dose of stimulation drugs based on certain characteristics of each woman, such as their age. New tests have been developed that some specialists believe can better predict a woman's response to IVF stimulation. These are called ovarian reserve tests and are a general measure of the number of eggs available in the ovaries. It is unclear whether tailoring the doses of stimulation drugs based on the individual ovarian reserve tests can help to increase the chance of the woman getting pregnant and having a baby. It is also unclear whether the tests help to improve the safety of the IVF cycle, such as reducing the chances of a serious condition known as ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2018

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome have menstrual disorders caused by the absence of ovulation. About 20% of women will not ovulate on clomiphene citrate, the primary treatment option. These women can be treated with a surgical procedure like laparoscopic electrocautery of the ovaries or by ovulation induction with gonadotrophins or gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH). In normal menstrual cycles, GnRH is released in a regular pulsatile interval. A portable pump can be used to mimic this pulse to help these women to ovulate and hopefully to get pregnant. The review of trials did not find enough evidence to show the effectiveness of pulsatile GnRH in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: July 21, 2003

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...