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Off-Label Use of Atypical Antipsychotics: An Update [Internet]

Antipsychotic medications are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and for some drugs, depression. We performed a systematic review on the efficacy and safety of atypical antipsychotic drugs for use in conditions lacking FDA approval.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: September 2011
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Drug Class Review: Beta Adrenergic Blockers: Final Report Update 4 [Internet]

Beta blockers inhibit the chronotropic, inotropic, and vasoconstrictor responses to the catecholamines, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Beta blockers differ in their duration of effect (3 hours to 22 hours), the types of beta receptors they block (β1-selective or β1/β2-nonselective), whether they are simultaneously capable of exerting low level heart rate increases (intrinsic sympathomimetic activity [ISA]), and in whether they provide additional blood vessel dilation effects by also blocking alpha-1 receptors. All beta blockers are approved for the treatment of hypertension. Other US Food and Drug Administration-approved uses are specific to each beta blocker and include stable and unstable angina, atrial arrhythmias, bleeding esophageal varices, coronary artery disease, asymptomatic and symptomatic heart failure, migraine, and secondary prevention of post-myocardial infarction. The objective of this review was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and harms of beta blockers in adult patients with hypertension, angina, coronary artery bypass graft, recent myocardial infarction, heart failure, atrial arrhythmia, migraine or bleeding esophageal varices.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: July 2009
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Transient Loss of Consciousness (‘Blackouts’) Management in Adults and Young People [Internet]

There are a number of existing guidelines, for epilepsy, falls and cardiac arrhythmias; which all relate to transient loss of consciousness (TLoC), but there is no guideline which addresses the initial assessment and management of patients who blackout. As such patients may come under the care of a range of clinicians, the lack of a clear pathway contributes to their misdiagnosis, and inappropriate treatment.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre for Acute and Chronic Conditions (UK).

Version: August 2010
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Diagnosis and Treatment of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

This systematic review summarizes research on methods of diagnosing myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) and benefits and harms of multiple medical and nonmedical treatments. It identifies evidence gaps and limitations to inform future research.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: December 2014
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Psychosocial and Pharmacologic Interventions for Disruptive Behavior in Children and Adolescents [Internet]

We systematically reviewed evidence on psychosocial and/or pharmacologic treatment for children with disruptive behavior disorders.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: October 2015
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Type 1 Diabetes in Adults: Diagnosis and Management

Type 1 diabetes affects over 370,000 adults in the UK, representing approximately 10% of adults diagnosed with diabetes. Given the complexity of its treatment regimens, successful outcomes depend, perhaps more than with any other long-term condition, on full engagement of the adult with type 1 diabetes in life-long day-by-day self-management. In order to support this, the health service needs to provide informed, expert support, education and training as well as a range of other more conventional biomedical services and interventionsfor the prevention and management of long term complications and disability.

NICE Guideline - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: August 2015

Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors (ACEIs), Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonists (ARBs), and Direct Renin Inhibitors for Treating Essential Hypertension: An Update [Internet]

A 2007 comparative effectiveness review (CER) evaluated the long-term benefits and harms of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) versus angiotensin II receptor blockers/antagonists (ARBs) for treating essential hypertension in adults. Since then, significant additional research has been published comparing these agents, and direct renin inhibitors (DRIs) have been introduced to the market. We sought to update 2007 CER on ACEIs versus ARBs and expand this to include comparisons with DRIs.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: June 2011
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Drug Class Review: Direct Renin Inhibitors, Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers: Final Report [Internet]

The renin-angiotensin system is a complex biologic system between the heart, brain, blood vessels, and kidneys that leads to the production of biologically active agents, including angiotensin I and II and aldosterone, which act together to impact a variety of bodily functions including blood vessel tone, sodium balance, and glomerular filtration pressure. The multiple and varied effects of these agents allows the renin-angiotensin system to play a wide role in the pathology of hypertension, cardiovascular health, and renal function. Our ability to begin to intervene upon the complex cycle of hormone and other biochemical agent production within the renin-angiotensin system began with the advent of the first orally active ACE-I (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor), captopril, in 1981. AIIRAs (angiotensin II receptor blockers) were developed as an alternative to ACE-I, and block the interaction between angiotensin II and the angiotensin receptor. Losartan, the first commercially available AIIRA, was approved for clinical use in 1995. The goal of this report is to compare the effectiveness and harms between aliskiren and placebo and between AIIRAs and ACEIs in the treatment of diagnosed coronary heart disease, hypertension, left ventricular dysfunction, heart failure, nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: January 2010
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Alcohol Use Disorders: Diagnosis and Clinical Management of Alcohol-Related Physical Complications [Internet]

Alcohol is the most widely used psychotropic drug in the industrialised world; it has been used for thousands of years as a social lubricant and anxiolytic. In the UK, it is estimated that 24% of adult men and 13% of adult women drink in a hazardous or harmful way. Levels of hazardous and harmful drinking are lowest in the central and eastern regions of England (21–24% of men and 10–14% of women). They are highest in the north (26–28% of men, 16–18% of women). Hazardous and harmful drinking are commonly encountered amongst hospital attendees; 12% of emergency department attendances are directly related to alcohol whilst 20% of patients admitted to hospital for illnesses unrelated to alcohol are drinking at potentially hazardous levels. Continued hazardous and harmful drinking can result in dependence and tolerance with the consequence that an abrupt reduction in intake might result in development of a withdrawal syndrome. In addition, persistent drinking at hazardous and harmful levels can also result in damage to almost every organ or system of the body. Alcohol-attributable conditions include liver damage, pancreatitis and the Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Key areas in the investigation and management of these conditions are covered in this guideline.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: 2010
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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (or Encephalopathy): Diagnosis and Management of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (or Encephalopathy) in Adults and Children [Internet]

The guideline covers care provided by healthcare professionals who have direct contact with and make decisions about the care of people with chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (or encephalopathy) (CFS/ME). It covers care provided in primary and secondary care, and in specialist centres/teams.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Primary Care (UK).

Version: August 2007
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Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression: Diagnosis and Management of Patients at Risk of or with Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

It is difficult to know what the true incidence of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is in England and Wales because the cases are not systematically recorded. However, evidence from an audit carried out in Scotland between 1997 and 1999 and from a published study from Ontario, Canada, suggests that the incidence may be up to 80 cases per million population per year. This would mean around 4000 cases per year in England and Wales or more than 100 cases per cancer network per year.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: November 2008
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The Management of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Men [Internet]

The guideline covers men (18 and over) with a clinical working diagnosis of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Options for conservative, pharmacological, surgical, and complementary or alternative treatments are considered in terms of clinical and cost effectiveness.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: 2010
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Parkinson's Disease: National Clinical Guideline for Diagnosis and Management in Primary and Secondary Care

It is almost 200 years since James Parkinson described the major symptoms of the disease that came to bear his name. Slowly but surely our understanding of the disease has improved and effective treatment has been developed, but Parkinson’s disease remains a huge challenge to those who suffer from it and to those involved in its management. In addition to the difficulties common to other disabling neurological conditions, the management of Parkinson’s disease must take into account the fact that the mainstay of pharmacological treatment, levodopa, can eventually produce dyskinesia and motor fluctuation. Furthermore, there are a number of agents besides levodopa that can help parkinsonian symptoms, and there is the enticing but unconfirmed prospect that other treatments might protect against worsening neurological disability. Thus, a considerable degree of judgement is required in tailoring individual therapy and in timing treatment initiation. It is hoped that this guideline on Parkinson’s disease will be of considerable help to those involved at all levels in these difficult management decisions. The guideline has been produced using standard NICE methodology and is therefore based on a thorough search for best evidence.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Chronic Conditions (UK).

Version: 2006
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Drug Class Review: Antiepileptic Drugs for Indications Other Than Epilepsy: Final Report Update 2 [Internet]

Antiepileptic drugs have been used beyond treatment of seizure disorders since the 1960s. As new antiepileptic drugs have become available, there has been interest in how they compare with older therapies (carbamazepine, phenytoin, and valproate) and each other in disorders where conventional pharmacotherapy has typically been suboptimal and limited by drug-related toxicity. The objective of this report is to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and harms of antiepileptic drugs used for bipolar disorder, fibromyalgia, migraine prophylaxis, and chronic pain.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: October 2008
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First-Generation Versus Second-Generation Antipsychotics in Adults: Comparative Effectiveness [Internet]

To compare individual first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) with individual second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) in adults (18 to 64 years) with schizophrenia, schizophrenia-related psychoses, or bipolar disorder, with a focus on core illness symptoms, functional outcomes, health care system utilization, and adverse events.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: August 2012
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Diabetes Medications for Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: An Update [Internet]

To evaluate the comparative effectiveness and safety of monotherapy and metformin-based combination therapy for type 2 diabetes.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 2016

The Epilepsies: The Diagnosis and Management of the Epilepsies in Adults and Children in Primary and Secondary Care: Pharmacological Update of Clinical Guideline 20

This guideline is a partial update of ‘The epilepsies: the diagnosis and management of the epilepsies in adults and children in primary and secondary care’ (NICE clinical guideline 20, 2004). It updates the pharmacological management sections of the 2004 guideline and also includes the use of the ketogenic diet.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: January 2012

Psychosis and Schizophrenia in Adults: Treatment and Management: Updated Edition 2014

This guideline has been developed to advise on the treatment and management of psychosis and schizophrenia in adults. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals, people with psychosis and schizophrenia, their carers and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guideline will be useful to clinicians and service commissioners in providing and planning highquality care for people with psychosis and schizophrenia while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for people with psychosis and schizophrenia and their carers.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2014
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Stroke: National Clinical Guideline for Diagnosis and Initial Management of Acute Stroke and Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA)

This guideline covers interventions in the acute stage of a stroke (‘acute stroke’) or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Most of the evidence considered relates to interventions in the first 48 hours after onset of symptoms, although some interventions of up to 2 weeks are covered as well. This guideline is a stand-alone document, but is designed to be read alongside the Intercollegiate Stroke Working Party guideline ‘National clinical guideline for stroke’ which considers evidence for interventions from the acute stage into rehabilitation and life after stroke. The Intercollegiate Stroke Working Party guideline is an update of the 2004 2nd edition and includes all the recommendations contained within this guideline. This acute stroke and TIA guideline is also designed to be read alongside the Department of Health’s (DH) ‘National stroke strategy’ (NSS). Where there are differences between the recommendations made within this acute stroke and TIA guideline and the NSS, the Guideline Development Group (GDG) members feel that their recommendations are derived from systematic methodology to identify all of the relevant literature.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Chronic Conditions (UK).

Version: 2008

Canagliflozin (Invokana) for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus [Internet]

Canagliflozin is the first sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor to be approved for use in Canada. Canagliflozin is indicated for patients with type 2 diabetes to improve glycemic control as monotherapy or in combination with metformin; a sulfonylurea; metformin and a sulfonylurea; metformin and pioglitazone; or insulin (with or without metformin) when these drugs do not provide adequate glycemic control. The recommended starting dose is 100 mg once daily. A dose of 300 mg once daily may be considered for patients who have tolerated a dose of 100 mg once daily and who need tighter glycemic control, provided they have an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and have a low risk of adverse reactions associated with reduced intravascular volume. Canagliflozin is contraindicated in renally impaired patients who have an eGFR of less than 45 mL/min/1.73 m2, have end-stage renal disease, or are on dialysis.

Common Drug Review - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: September 2015

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