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A rare, slow-growing tumor that begins in oligodendrocytes (cells that cover and protect nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord).

Results: 9

Does giving chemotherapy, radiotherapy or both improve survival in people with rare (anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas) brain tumours?

Traditionally, the standard of care for people with rare anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligoastrocytomas (brain tumours) has been surgery followed by radiotherapy. However, the benefit of adjuvant (post‐surgery) chemotherapy and radiotherapy is still unclear. In addition, the value of chromosome markers is also under investigation.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Adult Central Nervous System Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of adult central nervous system tumors.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: August 26, 2016

Are there any differences in survival between people with low grade glioma having early compared with delayed radiotherapy at the time of progression?

Low grade gliomas are brain tumours that predominantly affect young adults. They grow at slower rates and are typically associated with a favourable prognosis compared with high grade gliomas. One of the most common presenting symptoms of people with LGG are seizures. Although, there are no definitive guidelines on the management of LGGs, most people with LGGs are treated with a combination of surgery followed by radiotherapy. However, it is unclear whether to use radiotherapy in the early postoperative period, or to delay until the disease progresses.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Adult Central Nervous System Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of adult central nervous system tumors.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: January 31, 2017

Radiation dose escalation for malignant glioma

High grade glioma (HGG) is a rapidly growing brain tumour in the supporting cells of the nervous system, with several subtypes such as glioblastoma (grade IV astrocytoma), anaplastic (grade III) astrocytoma and anaplastic (grade III) oligodendroglioma. It affects about 5 in 100,000 people per year in Europe and North America. A number of studies have investigated the best strategy to give radiation for people with HGG, so there is a need to look at these studies closely to see what they say. Due to toxicity, radiation is not given all in one day. In order to balance toxicity and tumour control, smaller doses of radiation are given over several days.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy [Internet]

Conduct a systematic literature scan for published data for the treatment of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and provide a broad overview of the current state of SBRT for solid malignant tumors.

Comparative Effectiveness Technical Briefs - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: May 2011
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Update on Emerging Genetic Tests Currently Available for Clinical Use in Common Cancers [Internet]

The Coverage and Analysis Group at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) requested that the Technology Assessment Program (TAP) of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) conduct an update of genetic tests for cancer conditions that were identified since the 2011 horizon scan report on Genetic Testing for Cancer. AHRQ assigned this project to the Tufts Medical Center Evidence-based Practice Center (Contract Number: HHSA 290 2007 10055 I, Task Order #11).

Technology Assessment Report - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: July 19, 2013
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Chemotherapy plus radiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone in patients with anaplastic glioma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

OBJECT: The aim of this study was to answer whether overall survival and progression-free survival are increased in patients with anaplastic glioma who are treated with radiotherapy plus chemotherapy as compared with those who treated with radiotherapy alone.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

P53 codon 72 Arg/Pro polymorphism and glioma risk: an updated meta-analysis

P53 codon 72 Arg/Pro is a C/G variation upstream of the p53 gene on human chromosome 17p13. Many case-control studies have investigated the association between p53 codon 72 Arg/Pro polymorphism and glioma risk but provided inconsistent findings. To better understand the pathogenesis of glioma, we performed the current meta-analysis by pooling data from all available individual studies. According to the inclusion criteria, ten independent publications with 11 case-control studies were included into this meta-analysis. The pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) was calculated to estimate the effect of p53 codon 72 Arg/Pro variant on the development of glioma. Overall, no appreciable correlation was observed among the total studies in all gene models (ORPro allele vs. Arg allele = 1.04, 95 % CI = 0.90-1.20, P OR = 0.581; ORPro/Pro vs. Arg/Arg = 0.95, 95 % CI = 0.80-1.14, P OR = 0.614; ORPro/Arg vs. Arg/Arg = 1.01, 95 % CI = 0.79-1.29, P OR = 0.993; ORPro/Arg + Pro/Pro vs. Arg/Arg = 1.03, 95 % CI = 0.82-1.29, P OR = 0.799; ORPro/Pro vs. Arg/Arg + Pro/Arg = 1.02, 95 % CI = 0.86-1.22, P OR = 0.785). In stratified analyses by ethnicity, source of controls, and glioma subtypes, the p53 codon 72 Arg/Pro polymorphism did not alter the risk for glioma in population-based, hospital-based, astrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma studies among Caucasian. Interestingly, the Pro/Pro genotype seemed to be negatively associated with the glioma risk among patients with glioblastoma (ORPro/Pro vs. Arg/Arg = 0.68, 95 % CI = 0.48-0.95, P OR = 0.026). Our study suggests that the polymorphism of p53 codon 72 Arg/Pro may play a protective role in the development of glioblastoma. The relationship of p53 codon 72 Arg/Pro polymorphism with the susceptibility to glioma needs further estimation by more individual studies with high quality across ethnicities.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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