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Around 50% of women of childbearing age are either overweight [body mass index (BMI) 25–29.9 kg/m2] or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). The antenatal period provides an opportunity to manage weight in pregnancy. This has the potential to reduce maternal and fetal complications associated with excess weight gain and obesity.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: July 2012

The purpose of this guideline is to review all aspects of the methodology of induction of labour and the appropriateness of different approaches in the various clinical circumstances that may call for such an intervention.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: July 2008

This guideline contains recommendations specific to twin and triplet pregnancies and covers the following clinical areas: optimal methods to determine gestational age and chorionicity; maternal and fetal screening programmes to identify structural abnormalities, chromosomal abnormalities and feto-fetal transfusion syndrome (FFTS), and to detect intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR); the effectiveness of interventions to prevent spontaneous preterm birth; and routine (elective) antenatal corticosteroid prophylaxis for reducing perinatal morbidity. The guideline also advises how to give accurate, relevant and useful information to women with twin and triplet pregnancies and their families, and how best to support them.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: September 2011

The original antenatal care guideline was published by NICE in 2003. Since then a number of important pieces of evidence have become available, particularly concerning gestational diabetes, haemoglobinopathy and ultrasound, so that the update was initiated. This update has also provided an opportunity to look at a number of aspects of antenatal care: the development of a method to assess women for whom additional care is necessary (the ‘antenatal assessment tool’), information giving to women, lifestyle (vitamin D supplementation, alcohol consumption), screening for the baby (use of ultrasound for gestational age assessment and screening for fetal abnormalities, methods for determining normal fetal growth, placenta praevia), and screening for the mother (haemoglobinopathy screening, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and preterm labour, chlamydia).

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: March 2008

This guideline covers bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia, focusing on management of these conditions in children and young people aged younger than 16 years in primary and secondary care, and using evidence of direct relevance to these age groups where available.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: 2010

Clinical guidelines have been defined as ‘systematically developed statements which assist clinicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate treatment for specific conditions’. This clinical guideline concerns the management of diabetes and its complications from preconception to the postnatal period. It has been developed with the aim of providing guidance on:

NICE Guideline - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: February 2015

Antiepileptic drugs have been used beyond treatment of seizure disorders since the 1960s. As new antiepileptic drugs have become available, there has been interest in how they compare with older therapies (carbamazepine, phenytoin, and valproate) and each other in disorders where conventional pharmacotherapy has typically been suboptimal and limited by drug-related toxicity. The objective of this report is to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and harms of antiepileptic drugs used for bipolar disorder, fibromyalgia, migraine prophylaxis, and chronic pain.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: October 2008

It is a requirement of the Children’s National Service Framework that all ill children should have access to high-quality, cost-effective, evidence-based care. Because it is difficult to evaluate the severity of the illness, there is a need for evidence-based guidance to inform healthcare professionals about how to judge whether a child who presents with a fever is likely to develop a serious illness. Healthcare professionals also need advice to support their decision on whether to observe the child, perform diagnostic tests, start treatment such as antibiotics or refer onwards for specialist care. The guidance should also include advice on the best ways to detect fever, the management of fever itself, and what to tell parents and carers who have made contact with healthcare services. The guidance should be applicable to primary and secondary care and should take account of the number of agencies that are involved in giving health care and giving advice to parents and carers. It is also important that parental preferences, as well as the child’s best interests in terms of health outcomes, should be taken into account when considering the various options for investigation and treatment.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: May 2013

This User's Guide is intended to support the design, implementation, analysis, interpretation, and quality evaluation of registries created to increase understanding of patient outcomes. For the purposes of this guide, a patient registry is an organized system that uses observational study methods to collect uniform data (clinical and other) to evaluate specified outcomes for a population defined by a particular disease, condition, or exposure, and that serves one or more predetermined scientific, clinical, or policy purposes. A registry database is a file (or files) derived from the registry. Although registries can serve many purposes, this guide focuses on registries created for one or more of the following purposes: to describe the natural history of disease, to determine clinical effectiveness or cost-effectiveness of health care products and services, to measure or monitor safety and harm, and/or to measure quality of care.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 2014

This review investigated the frequency of adverse maternal and foetal outcomes associated with external cephalic version in comparison with persisting breech presentation at term. The authors concluded that adverse outcomes are rare though, owing to poor reporting and methodological limitations, there was insufficient evidence to properly quantify adverse maternal and foetal outcomes. The authors' conclusions are appropriate.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2006

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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