Home > Search Results

Results: 16

Metoclopramide for accurate placement of naso‐enteral feeding tube

When a person is unwell and is unable to eat (or to eat enough), the lack of nutrition can be a serious obstacle to recovery. In these circumstances, feeding through a feeding tube that enters through the nose and passes through the stomach to the small intestine beyond (a post‐pyloric naso‐enteral feeding tube), is an option.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Paracetamol (acetaminophen) with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine in adults

This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 11, 2010 (Derry 2010). New searches identified one additional study for inclusion; this study compared paracetamol with etodolac and did not contribute to any of the analyses in the review.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Aspirin with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2010 (Kirthi 2010); no new studies were found. A single oral dose of 1000 mg of aspirin reduced pain from moderate or severe to none by two hours in approximately 1 in 4 people (24%) taking aspirin, compared with about 1 in 10 (11%) taking placebo. Pain was reduced from moderate or severe to no worse than mild pain by two hours in roughly 1 in 2 people (52%) taking aspirin compared with approximately 1 in 3 (32%) taking placebo. Of those who experienced effective headache relief at two hours, more had that relief sustained over 24 hours with aspirin than with placebo. Addition of 10 mg of the antiemetic metoclopramide substantially increased relief of nausea and vomiting compared with aspirin alone, but made little difference to pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Anti‐sickness medication for vomiting in acute stomach upsets in children

Vomiting caused by acute gastroenteritis is very common in children and adolescents. Treatment of vomiting in children with acute gastroenteritis can be problematic and there is lack of agreement among clinicians on the indications for the use of antiemetics. There have also been concerns expressed about apparently unacceptable levels of side effects with some of the older generation of antiemetics. The small number of included trials provided evidence which appeared to favour the use of antiemetics over placebo to reduce the number of episodes of vomiting due to gastroenteritis in children. A single oral dose of ondansetron given to children with mild to moderate dehydration can control vomiting, avoid hospitalization and intravenous fluid administration which would otherwise be needed. There were no major side effects other than a few reports of increased frequency of diarrhea.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Interventions at caesarean section for reducing the risk of lung damage from inhaling stomach contents during anaesthesia

Thirty‐two studies were included in this review. However, only 22 studies, involving 2658 women, provided data for analysis, looking at interventions given prior to caesarean section for reducing the risk of aspiration. There were several different drugs and drug combinations being considered and the studies were generally of poor or questionable quality. Antacids (like sodium citrate), H2 receptor antagonists (like ranitidine), proton pump antagonists (like omeprazole), all reduced the acidity of the stomach contents. An antacid plus an H2 receptor antagonist also reduced acidity. In theory, a combination like this, where the antacid acts quickly and the H2 receptor antagonists takes a little longer, should protect at periods of greatest risk, i.e. the beginning and end of the procedure (i.e. intubation and extubation). More research is needed to identify the best combination of drugs and to check for possible adverse effects.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Pregnancy and birth: What is effective against nausea in pregnancy?

Common medications for nausea and vomiting as well as ginger are often used in pregnancy. But there is only little scientific research on their effectiveness in pregnant women.Nausea and vomiting are common in early pregnancy: At least half of all women are affected by some nausea in the first few months of pregnancy. Although it is called morning sickness, and it can actually be worse in the mornings, it may last all through the day too. Nausea and vomiting can be difficult to deal with for some weeks, but they usually do not have any consequences for the mother and her child.It is not known why pregnancy is so often accompanied by these symptoms. One theory is that it is due to hormonal changes. It is unknown whether stress or psychological problems cause or worsen the symptoms.Morning sickness typically starts between the sixth and eighth week of pregnancy and is gone by the end of 16 weeks. For some women, it will go on even longer. It is not only a problem because it makes pregnant women feel so unwell – it can also be more difficult to eat a healthy diet or to stay well-nourished.About 1 out of 100 women experience a severe form of nausea with frequent and violent vomiting. This can lead to weight and fluid loss which can also endanger the child and needs to be treated in hospital. There, the woman will receive medication and her body will be supplied with fluids.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: September 24, 2014

Medication for migraines

Migraine attacks can be treated with painkillers or migraine medication. If needed, medicine for nausea and vomiting can be taken as well. But if painkillers are taken too often they themselves may cause headaches.Lying down in a dark, cool room may be enough to relieve mild migraines. Migraines are usually very painful, though, so most people take medication to get through them. Over-the-counter painkillers may be effective enough for moderate pain. Stronger medication is sometimes needed for severe migraines.  If you often have migraines, it is a good idea to have different kinds of medicine on hand.The following medications can be used to treat migraine:The group of painkillers known as NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and acetaminophen (paracetamol)Anti-nausea medication Special migraine medication (triptans and ergotamines)

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: November 19, 2015

Interventions for treating severe nausea and vomiting during pregnancy (hyperemesis gravidarum)

Although severe nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (hyperemesis gravidarum) rarely causes death, it is an important cause of ill health with emotional, physical, and economic consequences. Women may need hospital treatment and may not be able to work and it occasionally causes pregnancy complications and adverse outcomes for babies such as low birthweight. Many pharmaceutical, complementary, and alternative therapies are available and the objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness and safety of interventions for hyperemesis gravidarum.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Reducing nausea and vomiting in women receiving regional anaesthesia for caesarean section

Caesarean section is a commonly performed operation for the birth of a baby when difficulties arise either for the mother or for the baby. Women may be either awake for the procedure (regional anaesthesia) or asleep (general anaesthesia). Nausea and vomiting are common and distressing symptoms, which can occur during the procedure if the woman is awake or they can also occur after the procedure. Low blood pressure and some of the medications administered during the procedure may contribute to the nausea and vomiting.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Drugs for preventing nausea and vomiting after surgery

We found eight drugs that reliably prevented nausea or vomiting after surgery. The drugs prevented nausea or vomiting in three or four people out of every 10 who would have vomited or felt nauseated with a placebo. We did not find reliable evidence that one drug was better than another. A person's age or sex, the type of surgery, or the time the drug was given did not change the effect of a drug. When drugs were given together, their effects simply added. Side effects were mild and affected four out of 100 people for the two drugs most studied.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2017

Wrist PC6 acupuncture point stimulation to prevent nausea and vomiting after surgery

Does a review of the evidence support the use of wrist PC6 acupuncture point stimulation (PC6 acupoint) as effective in reducing nausea and vomiting after surgery (PONV), compared to sham (dummy acupoint stimulation) or antiemetics (drugs that relieve nausea and vomiting) in people undergoing surgery? This review updates the evidence published in 2009, and is current to December 2014.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Medicines in the treatment of emergency department nausea and vomiting

We reviewed the effects of medicines in the treatment of nausea and vomiting in adults in the emergency department.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Sumatriptan (subcutaneous route of administration) for acute migraine attacks in adults

Sumatriptan is one of the triptan family of drugs used to treat migraine attacks. It is available as a subcutaneous injection, and this route of administration may be preferable for individuals experiencing nausea and/or vomiting, or needing fast relief. This review found that a single subcutaneous dose was effective in relieving migraine headache pain and associated symptoms of nausea, sensitivity to light, and sensitivity to sound. Pain was reduced from moderate or severe to no pain by two hours in almost 6 in 10 people (59%) taking sumatriptan 6 mg, compared with about 1 in 7 (15%) taking placebo, and reduced from moderate or severe to no worse than mild pain by two hours in almost 8 in 10 people (79%) taking sumatriptan compared with about 3 in 10 (31%) taking placebo. Subcutaneous sumatriptan was fast‐acting, and the majority of people experiencing pain relief had done so by one hour. About 3 in 10 (31%) people had freedom from pain at two hours which was sustained during the 24 hours postdose without the use of rescue medication, compared with about 1 in 7 (15%) with placebo. In addition to relieving headache pain, sumatriptan also relieved symptoms of nausea and sensitivity to light and sound by two hours in about half of those who took it, compared with about one‐third of those taking placebo. Adverse events, most of which were of short duration and mild or moderate in severity, were more frequent with sumatriptan than with placebo.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Routine prophylactic drugs in normal labour for reducing gastric aspiration and its effects

No good evidence for drugs, like antacids, in normal labour to reduce the small chance of inhaling some stomach contents if general anaesthesia is required.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Cannabis‐based medicine for nausea and vomiting in people treated with chemotherapy for cancer

As many as three‐quarters of people who receive chemotherapy experience nausea (feeling sick) and vomiting (being sick), which many find distressing. While conventional anti‐sickness medicines are effective, they do not work for everyone, all of the time. Therapeutic drugs based on the active ingredient of cannabis, known as THC (delta‐9‐tetrahydrocannabinol), have been approved for use as anti‐sickness medicines in some countries.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Nausea and Vomiting (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about nausea and vomiting as complications of cancer or its treatment. Approaches to the management of nausea and vomiting are discussed.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: September 2, 2015

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...