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Calcitonin treatment in lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: Podichetty VK, Varley ES, Lieberman I.  Calcitonin treatment in lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis. Spine 2011; 36(5): E357-E36421325931

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Therapeutic exercise and manual therapy for persons with lumbar spinal stenosis

Bibliographic details: Iversen MD, Choudhary VR, Patel SC.  Therapeutic exercise and manual therapy for persons with lumbar spinal stenosis. International Journal of Clinical Rheumatology 2010; 5(4): 425-437

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

A Randomized Trial of Epidural Glucocorticoid Injections for Spinal Stenosis: A Brief Summary of Findings for Clinicians

This is a summary of an original research article published in The New England Journal of Medicine in July 2014. The original article is available at www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1313265. This summary of evidence is provided to assist in informed clinical decisionmaking and should not be construed to represent clinical recommendations or guidelines.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Clinicians [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: June 29, 2016

Surgical versus non‐surgical treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis

Review question: We reviewed the evidence that compares surgery versus non‐surgical treatment for a condition called lumbar spinal stenosis. This condition occurs when the area surrounding the spinal cord and nerves becomes smaller.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Effectiveness of surgery for people with leg or back pain due to symptomatic spinal stenosis

Spinal stenosis is the narrowing of the spinal canal in the lower back region caused by thickening of the soft tissues and bones. It is a common condition for which surgery is usually performed after non‐surgical treatments (such as physiotherapy) have failed to bring sufficient relief to patients. Spinal stenosis is a common cause of low back pain that radiates to the legs, and it is more common in older adults. Surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis normally involves taking pressure off the spinal cord or spinal nerves (known as decompression) by removing bone and soft tissues from around the spinal canal. Another common surgical approach is to fuse two or more vertebrae together after decompression in the patient whose spine seems to be unstable. The usefulness of some types of surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis, however, has been questioned, and previous studies have reported that patients who receive fusion are more likely to have major complications and higher costs when compared with patients who undergo decompression only. More recently, spinal implants were created to help indirectly reduce pressure in the spinal canal and at the same time stabilise the bones. However, these implants have also been linked to worse outcomes (e.g., higher reoperation rates) when compared to conventional decompression.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Non‐surgical treatment for spinal stenosis with leg pain

We reviewed the evidence on the effectiveness of non‐surgical treatments for people with leg pain caused by pressure on the nerves in the spine.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Pain Management Injection Therapies for Low Back Pain [Internet]

Low back pain is common and injections with corticosteroids are a frequently used treatment option. This report reviews the current evidence on effectiveness and harms of epidural, facet joint, and sacroiliac corticosteroid injections for low back pain conditions.

Technology Assessment Report - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: 2015
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Can exercise give better results after spinal surgery for spinal stenosis?

Spinal stenosis occurs when the canal that the spinal nerves go through narrows and presses on nerves, causing pain in the back or legs. It tends to happen more often in older people. Surgery can help reduce the pressure, but although most patients find that their leg pain improves, back pain isn't always helped, and people still have problems carrying out everyday tasks. This review was done to find out whether a supervised  programme of exercise (a rehabilitation programme) after surgery was more helpful for patients in their everyday lives than the usual advice to stay active.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Surgery for degenerative lumbar spondylosis

Degeneration of the lumbar spine is described as lumbar spondylosis or degenerative disc disease and may lead to spinal stenosis (narrowing of the spinal canal), vertebral instability and/or malalignment, which may be associated with back pain and/or leg symptoms. This review considers the available evidence on the procedures of spinal decompression (widening the spinal canal or laminectomy), nerve root decompression (of one or more individual nerves) and fusion of adjacent vertebrae. There is moderate evidence that instrumentation can increase the fusion rate, but any improvement in clinical outcomes is probably marginal. The effectiveness of intra‐discal electrotherapy (IDET) remains unproven. Only preliminary results are available on disc replacement and it is not possible to draw any conclusions on this subject.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Acupuncture for lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

OBJECTIVES: Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) negatively affects patients' quality of life. No systematic review evaluating the effects and safety of acupuncture for this population is available. We aimed to evaluate evidence indicating the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for LSS.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis: an updated systematic review of the accuracy of diagnostic tests

STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review of diagnostic studies.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Interspinous spacer versus traditional decompressive surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: Dynamic interspinous spacers, such as X-stop, Coflex, DIAM, and Aperius, are widely used for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. However, controversy remains as to whether dynamic interspinous spacer use is superior to traditional decompressive surgery.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Physical therapy interventions for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic review

BACKGROUND: Physical therapy is commonly prescribed for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS); however, little is known about its effectiveness.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Surgery versus conservative treatment for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Nonoperative treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis with neurogenic claudication: a systematic review

STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Comparison of the efficacy and safety between interspinous process distraction device and open decompression surgery in treating lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta analysis

OBJECTIVES: The present study performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of interspinous process distraction device (IPD) compared with open decompression surgery (ODS) in treating lumbar spinal stenosis.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Comparison of surgical techniques for the treatment of patients with lumbar stenosis

Laminectomy is the "gold standard" surgical treatment for low back spinal stenosis. The goal of this surgical procedure is to alleviate symptoms such as pain, numbness and weakness of the legs and buttocks.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Efficacy of interspinous device versus surgical decompression in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis: a modified network analysis

The authors concluded that indirect evidence for disability and pain favoured interspinous device placement compared to decompression. There were no significant differences for other outcomes but findings should be considered with caution due to indirect comparisons and short follow-up periods. Given the limitations of the evidence and potential for bias in the review, the authors’ cautious conclusions seem appropriate.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

The effectiveness of land based exercise compared to decompressive surgery in the management of lumbar spinal-canal stenosis: a systematic review

BACKGROUND: Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is prevalent in those over the age of 65 years and the leading cause of spinal surgery in this population. Recent systematic reviews have examined the effectiveness of conservative management for LSS, but not relative to surgical interventions. The aim of this review was to systematically examine the effectiveness of land based exercise compared with decompressive surgery in the management of patients with LSS.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Manual therapy interventions for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic review

The authors concluded that evidence suggested that manual therapy combined with exercise may be of benefit in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis, but further research was needed. The heterogeneity, poor quality and doubtful applicability of most included studies and methodological limitations in the review mean that these conclusions may not be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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