Home > Search Results

Results: 1 to 20 of 329

Interventions for treating osteoarthritis of the big toe joint

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of interventions for osteoarthritis of the big toe joint.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

S‐Adenosylmethionine (SAMe) for osteoarthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of S‐Adenosylmethionine on osteoarthritis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Muscle relaxants for pain management in rheumatoid arthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of muscle relaxants on pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Exercise for osteoarthritis of the hip

OA is a disease of the joints, such as your hip. When the joint loses cartilage, the bone grows to try to repair the damage. However, instead of making things better, the bone grows abnormally and makes things worse. For example, the bone can become misshapen and make the joint painful and unstable. Doctors used to think that osteoarthritis (OA) simply resulted in thinning of the cartilage. However, it is now known that OA is a disease of the whole joint.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Therapeutic ultrasound for osteoarthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of therapeutic ultrasound on knee or hip osteoarthritis. The previous version of this review concluded that therapeutic ultrasound had no benefit over fake therapeutic ultrasound in pain relief and functional status.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

The effect of diets on rheumatoid arthritis

It is uncertain whether diets improve pain, stiffness and the ability to move better.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Opioid therapy for treating rheumatoid arthritis pain 

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of opioids for treating rheumatoid arthritis pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Antidepressants for pain management in rheumatoid arthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the affect of antidepressants on pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Acupuncture for osteoarthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of acupuncture on osteoarthritis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Exercise for osteoarthritis of the knee

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease of joints, such as the hip. When the joint loses cartilage, the bone grows to try to repair the damage. However, instead of making things better, the bone grows abnormally and makes things worse. For example, the bone can become misshapen and make the joint painful and unstable. Doctors used to think that OA simply resulted in thinning of the cartilage. However, it is now known that OA is a disease of the whole joint.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Neuromodulators for pain management in rheumatoid arthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of neuromodulators on pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Injection of lignocaine into a dislocated shoulder joint versus injection of a pain‐relieving drug with or without injection of a sedative drug into a vein for the purpose of manual manipulation of acute (less than 48 hours old) anterior (towards the front) displacement of a shoulder joint from its normal position.

Joint dislocation refers to displacement of the bones which form a joint away from their anatomical position. The shoulder is the most commonly dislocated joint managed in the emergency department (ED). When the dislocation occurs towards the front of the body, this is known as an anterior shoulder dislocation. It is called an acute anterior shoulder dislocation if the dislocation occurred with the previous 48 hours. Manually manipulating the displaced bones back to their normal position (manual reduction) is very painful. To allow for manual reduction, pain relief can be achieved either by injecting a local anaesthetic drug (for example, lignocaine) into the dislocated shoulder joint (intra‐articular lignocaine injection); or by injecting a pain killer with or without a sedative directly into the bloodstream through a vein (intravenous analgesia). The review authors searched the medical literature and identified five studies comparing these two methods. The studies included 211 patients with acute anterior shoulder dislocation; 113 patients underwent intra‐articular lignocaine injection and 98 underwent intravenous analgesia with sedation. The review found that there may be no difference in the immediate success of manual reduction of the dislocated shoulder between patients receiving intra‐articular lignocaine injection and those who received intravenous analgesia and sedation. However, intra‐articular lignocaine injection may be associated with fewer side effects and a shorter stay in the emergency department before discharge from hospital. Compared with intravenous analgesia and sedation, intra‐articular lignocaine may also be cheaper. However, the relatively small number of studies included in the review and the relatively small number of patients in each study means that the results of the review preclude definitive conclusions regarding the superiority of either method..

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Fracture repair compared with partial or total joint replacement for treating hip fractures located within the hip joint

Fractures of the thigh bone (femur) near the hip joint (termed intracapsular) may be treated by fixing the fracture (with screws or pins), or alternatively replacing the top of the femur at the hip joint (femoral head) with an artificial hip joint (arthroplasty).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Joint aspiration

Joint aspiration involves using a thin hollow needle to take some of the fluid out of the joint. Aspiration is one of the most common procedures used for muscle and bone diseases.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: July 13, 2016

Interventions for treating defects of the joint surfaces of the ankle bone in adults

Osteochondral defects are limited areas of damage to the lining of a joint. These defects involve the joint surface (chondral) and also the bone underneath the surface (osteo). The ankle is composed of three bones named the tibia (shin bone), fibula (the other lower leg bone) and talus (ankle bone). This review just looks osteochondral defects in the talus. Such defects occur mainly after trauma. They are rare but can result in pain and significant disability.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Orthodontics for treating temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders

There is no evidence about the effects of different types of orthodontic braces for problems associated with the joint between the lower jaw and skull. When the joint between the lower jaw and the base of the skull is not working well (temporomandibular disorders (TMD)), it can lead to abnormal jaw movement or locking, noises (clicking or grating), muscle spasms, tenderness or pain. TMD is very common, and it is believed by some that it may be caused by the occlusion (the way the teeth bite), trauma or psychological stress. There is also a belief that the pain associated with TMD is similar, in that respect, to low back pain and may be related to variations of a person's individual pain perception. Changes in the way the teeth meet can be produced by the use of active orthodontic appliances. This review found that there is no evidence from trials to show that active orthodontic treatment can prevent or relieve temporomandibular disorders adding support to teeth not being part of its cause. It is suspected that we do not know the real cause of TMD at present.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Interventions for treating osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or jaw joint is located in front of the ear on either side of the face. However, it is the only joint that the dentists and maxillofacial surgeons predominantly have to deal with. As with many of the other joints, the TMJ can be affected by osteoarthritis (OA). This is characterized by progressive destruction of the internal surfaces of the joint which can result in debilitating pain and joint noises. Several disorders other than OA may affect the TMJ and the correct diagnosis is important such that it can be matched with appropriate therapy.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Post‐operative therapy for metacarpophalangeal arthroplasty (knuckle joint replacement) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA)

‐ there was not enough information in the included study to tell whether wearing a hand splint and performing exercises (continuous passive motion) after surgery improves hand function, relieves pain, or corrects deformity.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Joint lavage for osteoarthritis of the knee

‐ may not improve pain and function compared to a sham treatment or no treatment.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Multidisciplinary rehabilitation programmes following joint replacement at the hip and knee in chronic arthropathy

Joint replacements are common procedures and treatment of choice for those with intractable joint pain and disability arising from arthropathy of the hip or knee. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation is considered integral to the outcome of joint replacement.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...