Home > Search Results

Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food.

Results: 1 to 20 of 181

Clear

Erythropoietin, a hormone, may help to treat women who develop anaemia after giving birth, but there may be rare adverse events.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: October 18, 2004

Anaemia is a condition where the blood contains less than normal haemoglobin (low blood count), as shown in blood tests. Haemoglobin is the molecule within red blood cells that requires iron to carry oxygen. Insufficient iron intake/uptake and iron loss (bleeding) can cause iron deficiency anaemia. Anaemia symptoms include tiredness, shortness of breath and dizziness. Women may bleed severely at childbirth and many pregnant women already have anaemia, which can worsen as a result of bleeding. Severe anaemia can be linked to maternal deaths. Iron deficiency anaemia after childbirth is more likely to occur in low‐income countries.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: August 13, 2015

In 2006, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concluded that the evidence was insufficient to recommend for or against routine screening and supplementation for asymptomatic children ages 6 to 12 months at average risk for iron deficiency anemia but recommended routine iron supplementation for those at increased risk.

Evidence Syntheses - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: March 2015

In 2006, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended routine screening for iron deficiency anemia in asymptomatic, pregnant women but found insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine iron supplementation for nonanemic pregnant women.

Evidence Syntheses - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: March 2015

Bibliographic details: Chung M, Moorthy D, Hadar N, Salvi P, Iovin RC, Lau J.  Biomarkers for assessing and managing iron deficiency anemia in late-stage chronic kidney disease. Rockville, MD, USA: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Comparatvie Effectiveness Review; 83. 201223230575

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

When the blood has insufficient red cells, or the red cells carry insufficient haemoglobin to deliver adequate oxygen to the tissues, this is called anaemia. There is normally a reduction in the haemoglobin concentrations in the mother's blood during pregnancy, and this allows a better blood flow around the womb (uterus) and to the baby. This is sometime called physiological anaemia and needs no treatment. True anaemia, however, can be mild, moderate or severe and can cause weakness, tiredness and dizziness. Severe anaemia makes women at risk of cardiac failure and is very common in low‐income countries Anaemia has many causes including a shortage or iron, folic acid or vitamin B12. These are all required for making red cells and are available in a good diet. Iron shortage, however, is the most common cause of anaemia during pregnancy. Iron treatment can be given by mouth (oral), by injection into the muscle (intramuscular) or injection into the vein (intravenous). Blood transfusion or giving something which stimulates the body to produce more red cells (erythropoietin) are also possible treatments.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: October 5, 2011

Approximately one billion people worldwide are deficient in at least one vitamin or mineral (also known of micronutrients). Iron, vitamin A, zinc and iodine deficiencies are very frequent among children of preschool (aged 24 months to less than 5 years) and school age (5 to 12 years of age), limiting their health and daily physical performance. Anaemia, the condition in which red blood cells have limited capacity to carry oxygen, frequently results after prolonged iron deficiency.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: November 23, 2017

Iron deficiency can cause symptoms of tiredness. The interval between blood donations is set by independent regulators to minimise iron deficiency in donors. Potential blood donors are screened each time they visit to give blood to see if they have iron deficiency. Donors who do not pass this screening test and so cannot give blood are deferred and asked to delay giving blood, but many of these donors do not return. If blood donors take iron tablets then the risk of becoming iron deficient may be reduced. However, the balance between the benefits of giving iron and the possible side effects is not clear. We have reviewed all the randomised trials testing the benefits of giving blood donors iron. The evidence is current up to November 2013.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: July 3, 2014

Determination of serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is proposed to distinguish between iron-deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. Here we conducted a meta-analysis of the literature to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of sTfR and sTfR/log ferritin index. The meta-analysis included 18 sTfR and 10 sTfR index studies. Three sTfR index studies were, however, eliminated as outliers. The odds ratio was significant for both sTfR (22.9, 95% confidence interval [CI], 9.6-55.0) and sTfR index (9.5, 95% CI, 5.0-18.1) in a heterogeneous set of studies. Meta-analysis for sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios (LRs) was performed only in a subset of 10 sTfR studies. The overall sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative LRs were 86%, 75%, 3.85, and 0.19, respectively, with an area under summary receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.912 (standard error, 0.039). Additional studies are needed to define the overall diagnostic accuracy of sTfR.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Approximately one out of three non‐pregnant women of reproductive age are anaemic worldwide. Although causes of anaemia are multiple, it very often results from sustained iron deficiency. Being anaemic makes women more likely to suffer infections and to have a diminished physical and work performance. If they become pregnant, they may also have a greater risk of having low birth weight babies and other complications during delivery.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: December 7, 2011

BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and iron deficiency anemia are prevalent in disadvantaged populations worldwide. The benefit of H. pylori eradiation for iron deficiency anemia has been extensively studied, but data are still equivocal.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Oral iron salts such as ferrous fumarate, ferrous gluconate, and ferrous sulfate have been the mainstay of oral iron supplementation because they are inexpensive, effective at restoring iron balance, and have good overall safety and tolerability profile. However, in some patients, absorption of oral iron salts is inadequate, and poor tolerance results in reduced adherence to therapy. Polysaccharide iron complex and heme iron polypeptide products have become available as alternative therapies, offering improved absorption and tolerability profile over the traditional iron salts. However, they are significantly more expensive than iron salts. The aim of this review is to summarize current evidence on the comparative clinical and cost effectiveness of oral and injectable iron supplementation products for iron deficiency anemia (IDA).

Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: January 6, 2016

Ferumoxytol (Feraheme) is a colloidal superparamegnetic iron-carbohydrate complex that was specifically designed to reduce immunological reactivity. It can be rapidly administered (IV rate of 30–60 seconds) as a 510 mg dose with the second IV injection administered two to eight days later. The federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States has listed ferumoxytol for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA, characterized by iron deficiency) in adult patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Health Canada has recently placed restrictions on the use of ferumoxytol due to the potential for serious allergic reactions. Therefore, this review was performed to assess the clinical effectiveness and safety of ferumoxytol compared with other IV iron therapies for patients with IDA. In addition, cost-effectiveness and evidence-based guidelines were also investigated to determine the costs associated with ferumoxytol and its use in patients with IDA. This is an update to a previous review on ferumoxytol which found limited evidence that stated that it seemed to have comparable efficacy to other iron complexes but that it was associated with an increased adverse event profile.

Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: November 21, 2014

This review evaluates the potential of delayed cord-clamping for improving iron status and reducing anaemia in term infants and for increasing the risk of polycythaemia and hyperbilirubinaemia. We applied a strict search protocol to identify controlled trials of early vs late cord-clamping. Four trials from developing and four from industrialised countries were finally assessed. Two of the four studies from developing countries found a significant difference in infant haemoglobin levels at 2-3 months of age in favour of delayed cord-clamping. This difference was more marked when mothers were anaemic. Three of four studies from industrialised countries showed a significant difference in haematocrit levels in favour of delayed clamping. Although meta-analysis showed an increased risk for hyperbilirubinaemia of 12%, no studies reported the need to apply phototherapy or perform exchange transfusion. We conclude that delayed cord-clamping in term infants, especially those with anaemic mothers, increases haemoglobin concentration in infants at 2-3 months of age and reduces the risk of anaemia, without an associated increased risk of perinatal complications. In developing countries where fetal anaemia is common, the advantages of delayed cord-clamping might be especially beneficial.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2004

OBJECTIVE: To complete a systematic review of the effect of preparing food cooked in iron pots on haemoglobin concentrations and to assess compliance with pot use. DESIGN AND SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, The Cochrane Controlled trials Register, The Cochrane Methodology Register, Health Technology Assessment Database and NHS Economic Evaluation Database (Cochrane Library, Issue 3, 2002). Medline (1966 to May 2002) and EMBASE (1988 to May 2002). Reference lists of published trials were examined for other potentially relevant trials and authors of selected trials were contacted to obtain information about ongoing or unpublished trials. Selection criteria included randomized trials which compared the effect of food cooked in cast iron pots with food cooked in noncast iron pots on participants of a minimum age of 4 months. One reviewer applied inclusion criteria to potentially relevant trials. Two reviewers assessed trial quality and extracted data.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

BACKGROUND: Recent guidelines on iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) have confirmed the aetiological role of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori), but the relationship still remains controversial.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Anaemia is one of the most common haematologic problem found in children with HIV/AIDS, second only to depletion of CD4/helper T lymphocytes. Anaemia in HIV‐infected children can be caused by direct effects of HIV, other prevalent infections and opportunistic infections on blood producing cells; micronutrient deficiencies; or side effects of drugs used to prevent or treat opportunistic infections and HIV. Deficiency of iron, a micronutrient, is by far the most common cause of nutritional anaemia worldwide. Given the global prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia, especially in parts of the world where childhood HIV infections are quite prevalent, it is likely many HIV‐infected children also are iron deficient. There is very little known, however, about the contribution of iron deficiency to anaemia observed in children with HIV/AIDS. Iron supplementation currently is given routinely to anaemic children in most of the developing countries where there also are high rates of HIV infection, and no obvious adverse effects have been observed. However, there are reports of a deleterious effect of iron supplementation during ongoing infections, including malaria. As iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia are common in HIV‐infected children in high‐prevalence areas with concerns about possible deleterious effects of iron, we looked for randomised clinical trials that demonstrated benefits or disadvantages of iron supplements, regardless of type or preparation. We did not find any such trials and conclude that there is a need for large multi‐centre trials to examine these questions.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: January 21, 2009

Anaemia is defined internationally as a state in which the quality and/or quantity of circulating red blood cells is below normal. Blood haemoglobin (Hb) concentration serves as the key indicator for anaemia because it can be measured directly and has an international standard. In response to low tissue oxygen levels in anaemia the kidney produces the hormone erythropoietin which stimulates the bone marrow to produce red blood cells. A major cause of the anaemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a reduction in erythropoietin production due to kidney damage.

NICE Guideline - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: June 2015

Iron deficiency (a shortage of iron stored in the body) and anaemia (low levels of haemoglobin ‐ healthy red blood cells ‐ in the blood) are common problems globally, especially in women. Low levels of iron can eventually cause anaemia (irondeficiency anaemia). Among non‐pregnant women, around one third are anaemic worldwide. The problem is seen most commonly in low‐income countries, but iron deficiency and anaemia are more common in women in all contexts. Irondeficiency anaemia is considered to impair health and well‐being in women, and iron supplements ‐ tablets, capsules, syrup or drops containing iron ‐ are a commonly used intervention to prevent and treat this condition. We sought to review the evidence of iron, taken orally for at least five days per week, for improving health outcomes in non‐pregnant women of reproductive age (menstruating women).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: April 18, 2016

During pregnancy, women need iron and folate to meet both their own needs and those of the developing baby. The concern is that if pregnant women become deficient in these nutrients they are unable to supply them in sufficient quantities to their baby. Low folate nutrition before conceiving increases the risk of the baby having neural tube defects. Low iron and folate levels in women can cause anaemia, which can make women tired, faint, and at increased risk of infection.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: July 22, 2015

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (395)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...