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Study assessing the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in aiding the localisation of prostate abnormalities for biopsy found that MRS had higher sensitivity and specificity than T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2-MRI) but produced no definitive conclusions on the cost-effectiveness of using different MRS/MRI sequences.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: May 2013

It is difficult to know what the true incidence of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is in England and Wales because the cases are not systematically recorded. However, evidence from an audit carried out in Scotland between 1997 and 1999 and from a published study from Ontario, Canada, suggests that the incidence may be up to 80 cases per million population per year. This would mean around 4000 cases per year in England and Wales or more than 100 cases per cancer network per year.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: November 2008

The original Prostate Cancer: Diagnosis and Treatment Guideline published in 2008 was the first clinical guideline produced by the National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (NCC-C); accordingly this is now the first NCC-C clinical guideline to be reviewed and updated. Many areas of the original guideline are unchanged as there is little or no new evidence; other aspects have been completely rewritten. As ever there are still many topics where the research evidence is incomplete or conflicting, and so the Guideline Development Group (GDG) have been required to reach a consensus using the evidence available to them in several areas. In places where it was clear that further work needed to be done, new research recommendations have been made which we hope will be used as the basis for future research work.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: January 2014

The study found that the clinical benefit of using the PCA3 assay or the phi in combination with existing tests, scans and clinical judgement has not yet been confirmed. Results from the cost-effectiveness analyses indicate that the use of these tests in the NHS would not be cost-effective.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: October 2015

To summarize publically available guidance for, and current use of, meta-analytic methods for mixed treatment comparison (MTC) evidence synthesis; to identify analyses using these methods and summarize their characteristics; to gain insight regarding the rationale for selection, implementation, and reporting of such methods from investigators.

Methods Research Reports - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: August 2012

The study found that in the treatment of localised prostate cancer, the evidence regarding the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ablative therapies compared with radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy and active surveillance is insufficient to influence current clinical practice.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: July 2015

Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of nutrition and dietary supplements for reducing the risk of developing prostate cancer or for treating prostate cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: September 14, 2017

Calcium, green tea, lycopene, pomegranate, selenium, soy and vitamin E have been studied for prostate cancer prevention or treatment. Read about laboratory and human studies on various prostate supplements in this expert-reviewed summary.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: September 13, 2017

Expert-reviewed information summary about tests used to detect or screen for prostate cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: September 29, 2017

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of prostate cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: July 21, 2017

The specificity of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for early intervention in repeat biopsy is unsatisfactory. Prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) may be more accurate in outcome prediction than other methods for the early detection of prostate cancer (PCa). However, the results were inconsistent in repeated biopsies. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the role of PCA3 in outcome prediction. A systematic bibliographic search was conducted for articles published before April 2013, using PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, Embase and other databases from health technology assessment agencies. The quality of the studies was assessed on the basis of QUADAS criteria. Eleven studies of diagnostic tests with moderate to high quality were selected. A meta-analysis was carried out to synthesize the results. The results of the meta-analyses were heterogeneous among studies. We performed a subgroup analysis (with or without inclusion of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP)). Using a PCA3 cutoff of 20 or 35, in the two sub-groups, the global sensitivity values were 0.93 or 0.80 and 0.79 or 0.75, specificities were 0.65 or 0.44 and 0.78 or 0.70, positive likelihood ratios were 1.86 or 1.58 and 2.49 or 1.78, negative likelihood ratios were 0.81 or 0.43 and 0.91 or 0.82 and diagnostic odd ratios (ORs) were 5.73 or 3.45 and 7.13 or 4.11, respectively. The areas under the curve (AUCs) of the summary receiver operating characteristic curve were 0.85 or 0.72 and 0.81 or 0.69, respectively. PCA3 can be used for repeat biopsy of the prostate to improve accuracy of PCa detection. Unnecessary biopsies can be avoided by using a PCa cutoff score of 20.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

The specificity of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for early intervention in repeat biopsy is unsatisfactory. Prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) may be more accurate in outcome prediction than other methods for the early detection of prostate cancer (PCa). However, the results were inconsistent in repeated biopsies. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the role of PCA3 in outcome prediction. A systematic bibliographic search was conducted for articles published before April 2013, using PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, Embase and other databases from health technology assessment agencies. The quality of the studies was assessed on the basis of QUADAS criteria. Eleven studies of diagnostic tests with moderate to high quality were selected. A meta-analysis was carried out to synthesize the results. The results of the meta-analyses were heterogeneous among studies. We performed a subgroup analysis (with or without inclusion of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP)). Using a PCA3 cutoff of 20 or 35, in the two sub-groups, the global sensitivity values were 0.93 or 0.80 and 0.79 or 0.75, specificities were 0.65 or 0.44 and 0.78 or 0.70, positive likelihood ratios were 1.86 or 1.58 and 2.49 or 1.78, negative likelihood ratios were 0.81 or 0.43 and 0.91 or 0.82 and diagnostic odd ratios (ORs) were 5.73 or 3.45 and 7.13 or 4.11, respectively. The areas under the curve (AUCs) of the summary receiver operating characteristic curve were 0.85 or 0.72 and 0.81 or 0.69, respectively. PCA3 can be used for repeat biopsy of the prostate to improve accuracy of PCa detection. Unnecessary biopsies can be avoided by using a PCa cutoff score of 20.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

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