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Combined DTP‐HBV‐HIB vaccine versus separately administered DTP‐HBV and HIB vaccines in healthy infants up to two years old

Childhood vaccinations provide an effective method of protection against diseases. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that routine infant immunisation programmes include a vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae (H. influenza) type B (HIB) in the combined diphtheria‐tetanus‐pertussis (DTP)‐hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination. We compared the combined DTP‐HBV‐HIB vaccine with the separate DTP‐HBV and HIB vaccines. Studies only reported on immunogenicity and reactogenicity.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Vaccines for preventing severe Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infections in people with sickle cell disease

We reviewed the available evidence from randomised controlled trials about how effective and safe Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccines are for people with sickle cell disease.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Safety of Vaccines Used for Routine Immunization in the United States

To conduct a systematic review of the literature on the safety of vaccines recommended for routine immunization of children, adolescents, and adults in the United States as of 2011.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: July 2014
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Bacterial Meningitis and Meningococcal Septicaemia: Management of Bacterial Meningitis and Meningococcal Septicaemia in Children and Young People Younger than 16 Years in Primary and Secondary Care

This guideline covers bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia, focusing on management of these conditions in children and young people aged younger than 16 years in primary and secondary care, and using evidence of direct relevance to these age groups where available.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: 2010
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Effectiveness of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines administered according to various schedules: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational data

BACKGROUND: Conjugate vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) are widely used. The full implications of Hib vaccination schedule for vaccine effectiveness (VE) are unclear.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Comparing haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine schedules: a systematic review and meta-analysis of vaccine trials

BACKGROUND: The optimal schedule and the need for a booster dose are unclear for Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccines. We systematically reviewed relative effects of Hib vaccine schedules.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Efficacy of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccination of children: a meta-analysis

This review assessed the efficacy of the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in children under 5 years old. The authors stated that Hib conjugate vaccines are safe and effective in reducing the risk of all forms of invasive Hib disease. Despite some limitations in the trial data and uncertainties in the review methodology, the authors' conclusions appear to be supported by the evidence presented.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2006

Dose-specific efficacy of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines: a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials

The authors concluded that Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccination had an average efficacy of 93% and 92% after three and two doses and of 59% after one dose and that incomplete dosing needed to be taken into account when assessing vaccination impact. The review had some quality limitations but the results appear to be supported by the data presented.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

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