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Treats Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). This medicine is a macrolide antibiotic.

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The aim of this report is to assess the added benefit of fidaxomicin according to its approval for the following therapeutic indication: treatment of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) also known as Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD).

Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: April 11, 2013

On 28 May 2013 the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA) commissioned the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) to conduct a supplementary assessment for Commission A13-05 (benefit assessment of fidaxomicin).

Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: June 25, 2013

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a bacterium that can live harmlessly in the colon, but when an individual takes an antibiotic for another condition, the C. difficile can grow and replace most of the normal bacterial flora that live in the colon. This overgrowth causes C. difficile‐associated diarrhoea (also known as C. difficile infection ‐ CDI). The symptoms of CDI include diarrhoea, fever and pain. CDI may be only mild but in many cases is very serious and, if untreated, can be fatal. There are many proposed treatments for CDI, but the most common are withdrawing the antibiotic that caused the CDI and prescribing an antibiotic that kills the bacterium. Many antibiotics have been tested in clinical trials for effectiveness and this review studies the comparisons of these antibiotics. This review is an update of a previously published Cochrane review.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: March 3, 2017

This summary will provide information from the most recent review of research on C-diff infections to help you understand your treatment options and ways to prevent future infections.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Consumers [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: December 19, 2011

Update a 2011 review of differences in accuracy of diagnostic tests and the effects of interventions to prevent and treat Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in adults.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: March 2016

The Minneapolis VA Evidence-based Synthesis Program was asked to conduct a systematic evidence review regarding the effectiveness of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for treatment of C. difficile infection (CDI), in part to help guide policy makers within the Veterans Health Administration determine if the evidence supporting MT was sufficient to implement FMT programs in their facilities. The topic was nominated by Jason Dominitz, MD, MHS on behalf of the VA Gastroenterology Field Advisory Committee.

Evidence-based Synthesis Program - Department of Veterans Affairs (US).

Version: July 2014

A systematic review of 102 clinical studies published from December 1978 to August 2011 examined the comparative effectiveness of diagnostic tests, treatments, and prevention strategies for Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) in adults. The review did not include an evaluation of other causes of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. This summary is provided to inform discussions of options with patients and to assist in decisionmaking along with consideration of a patient's values and preferences. However, reviews of evidence should not be construed to represent clinical recommendations or guidelines. The full report is available at www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/cdiff.cfm.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Clinicians [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: December 19, 2011

INTRODUCTION: Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic associated infectious nosocomial diarrhoea. Limited number of new pharmaceutical products have been developed and registered in the past decades for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection. The available scientific evidence is limited and hardly comparable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Multiplex testing in suspected infectious gastroenteritis has uncertain clinical value: testing generally identifies pathogens identified by conventional testing but also additional positive results of uncertain clinical importance.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: April 2017

To conduct a systematic review and synthesize evidence for differences in the accuracy of diagnostic tests, and the effects of interventions to prevent and treat Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in adult patients.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: December 2011

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection is the most common cause of nosocomial infectious diarrhea in adults. The spread of a hypervirulent strain of C. difficile has caused recent outbreaks of C. difficile infection. Metronidazole and vancomycin are the antibiotics of choice to treat C. difficile infection. An assessment was prepared to help guide the choice of therapy for C. difficile infection and to inform reimbursement policies in the Canadian publicly funded health care system.

CADTH Technology Report - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: January 2011

BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) recurs in nearly one-third of patients who develop an initial infection. Recurrent CDI (RCDI) is associated with considerable morbidity, mortality, and cost. Treatment for RCDI has not been not well examined.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

This review compared the effectiveness and harms of antibiotic treatments in adult patients with Clostridium difficile infection. The authors concluded that no antimicrobial agent was clearly superior for initial cure and recurrence was less frequent with fidaxomicin than vancomycin. The suboptimal quality of studies, small sample sizes and variable study characteristics suggest that the cautious conclusion is justified.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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