Home > Search Results

The buildup of fat in liver cells, commonly caused by alcoholism. Other causes include obesity, diabetes, and pregnancy. Also called fatty liver.

Results: 1 to 20 of 215

No evidence to support or refute probiotics for patients with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and/or steatohepatitis

Probiotics have been proposed as a treatment option for patients with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and non‐alcoholic steatohepatitis because of their balancing role on the flora of the gut that may act as a potential source of hepatotoxic oxidative injury. This review did not identify any randomised clinical trials with probiotics in non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and non‐alcoholic steatohepatitis. Even if the results from pilot studies seem promising, randomised clinical trials are necessary to asses the clinical implication of probiotics therapy in non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and non‐alcoholic steatohepatitis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

No evidence to support or refute antioxidant supplements for patients with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and/or steatohepatitis

Non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease is characterised by fatty deposition in the hepatocytes in the absence of excessive alcohol intake and of other known causes of fatty liver. Hepatic injury might be improved by antioxidant supplements. This systematic review identified six randomised clinical trials. No liver‐related or unrelated deaths occurred in any of the included trials. Adverse events were minor and non‐specific. Treatment with antioxidant supplements showed a significant, though not clinically relevant, amelioration of aspartate aminotransferase, but not of alanine aminotransferase, as compared to placebo or other interventions. Data on the radiological and/or histological response were too limited to draw any conclusions. Further placebo‐controlled trials are necessary.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

No evidence to support or refute the effect of bile acids in patients with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease and/or steatohepatitis

Non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease is a condition characterised by fatty deposition in the hepatocytes in patients with minimal or no alcohol intake. Hepatic injury might be improved by bile acids. This systematic review identified four randomised clinical trials. Bile acids did not cause any liver‐related deaths and were associated with only minor, non‐specific adverse events. However, these agents did not show any significant amelioration of common liver function tests as compared with placebo. Moreover, data on the radiological (ultrasonography and computer tomography scan) and/or histological response were too limited to draw any conclusions. Further randomised placebo‐controlled trials are necessary.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Weight reduction for non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease

Weight reduction with different measures for treating non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is recommended, though this is not evidence‐based. We performed this systematic review to investigate the beneficial and harmful effects of weight reduction with different measures for NAFLD patients, but we could not find firm evidence. Five trials on lifestyle programme and two trials on orlistat were obtained, and all but one had high risk of bias. There seemed to be some beneficial effects of lifestyle programme involving restricted diet and physical exercise for NAFLD patients. However, the data were sparse, and meta‐analyses could not be performed. Well‐designed randomised clinical trials are needed to establish the true effect of the weight reduction measures identified for our review. The long‐term prognosis of development of fibrosis, mortality, and quality of life modified by weight reduction should be studied. Special attention should be paid to the amount of weight loss.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Assessment and Management

This guideline covers identifying, diagnosing and assessing disease severity in adults, children and young people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). It also covers both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, disease monitoring and the risk of extra-hepatic conditions associated with NAFLD.

NICE Guideline - National Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: July 2016
Show search results within this document

Cost-effectiveness of non-invasive methods for assessment and monitoring of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in patients with chronic liver disease: systematic review and economic evaluation

The study found that treating all patients with chronic hepatitis C without a prior non-invasive liver test (NILT) is cost-effective; however, recently approved interferon-free regimens were not included. For hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-negative patients, this strategy is cost-effective only if the higher cost-effectiveness threshold is appropriate. For HBeAg-positive patients, two NILTs applied sequentially were cost-effective but highly uncertain. No conclusive results could be obtained for alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Most studies evaluating non-invasive fibrosis tests had a high risk of bias.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: January 2015
Show search results within this document

Herbal medicines for fatty liver diseases

Fatty liver disease is a potentially reversible illness where fat builds up within the cells of the liver. It may lead to the liver no longer being able to function properly; this is called end‐stage liver disease. This systematic review evaluated the effects and safety of herbal medicines (single herbs, branded herbal medicines, and prescribed formulas) for treating fatty liver disease.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Insulin Sensitisers in the Treatment of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Systematic Review

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is closely linked with obesity and the prevalence of NAFLD is about 17% to 33% in the Western world. There is a strong association of NAFLD with insulin resistance and, hence, insulin sensitisers have been tried. This systematic review examined the clinical effectiveness of insulin sensitisers in patients with NAFLD, to help decide whether or not a trial or trials of the insulin sensitisers was necessary and also to explore whether or not non-invasive alternatives to liver biopsy were available that could be used in a large trial of the insulin sensitisers.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: November 2011
Show search results within this document

Insulin sensitisers in the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a systematic review.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a spectrum of disease, ranging from an increased fat content in the liver (steatosis) to inflammatory change (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis – NASH), and potentially to fibrosis and cirrhosis. By definition, it is seen in people whose alcohol intake is not increased (such as < 10 g a day for women, < 20 g a day for men).

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: 2011

Efficacy of ursodesoxycholic acid in treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: Li W, Wang F, Lv ZS, Zhang AQ.  Efficacy of ursodesoxycholic acid in treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a meta-analysis. World Chinese Journal of Digestology 2013; 21(23): 2335-2343

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Efficacy of metformin in the treatment of adult nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: Zhang ZF, Zhao G, Zhu Y, Wang L-X, Zhu L.  Efficacy of metformin in the treatment of adult nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a meta-analysis. World Chinese Journal of Digestology 2010; 18(16): 1717-1723

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

The role of omega-3 fatty acids on the prevention and treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a review of published papers

Bibliographic details: Zolfaghari H, Jafarian K, Iraj B, Askari G.  The role of omega-3 fatty acids on the prevention and treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a review of published papers. Journal of Isfahan Medical School 2014; 32(276): epub

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

[Yinchenhao decoction adjustment for treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials]

Bibliographic details: Zhang LD, Wei W, Sun XH, Yao KW.  [Yinchenhao decoction adjustment for treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials]. World Chinese Journal of Digestology 2014; 22(16): 2327-2337 Available from: http://www.wjgnet.com/1009-3079/22/2327.asp

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

[Efficacy of antioxidants in treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver: a systematic review]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of antioxidants in the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Does PPARγ2 gene Pro12Ala polymorphism affect nonalcoholic fatty liver disease risk? Evidence from a meta-analysis

Genetic factors can substantially contribute to the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). A missense Pro12Ala substitution in the PPARγ2 gene (rs1801282) has been studied in relation with NAFLD risk in different ethnic groups, but findings have been inconclusive. The aim of this was to evaluate the association between rs1801282 and NAFLD through meta-analysis of all relevant published evidence. A systematic search to find eligible studies was performed in Medline, HuGE Navigator, and SCOPUS databases. The strength of association was evaluated using odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals obtained from a random effect approach and under additive, dominant, co-dominant, recessive, and allelic contrast models. Seven studies comprising 1474 cases and 2259 controls met the eligibility criteria and included in the meta-analysis. Combined results did not indicate any predisposing or protective effect for rs1801282 under any of the assessed modes of inheritance. The rate of heterogeneity was generally high due to the inter-study variations in terms of age, gender, and ethnicity. Evidence from the current meta-analysis indicated that rs1801282 variants are not associated with NAFLD risk. Future large-scale studies are required to substantiate the present findings.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Traditional Chinese medicines benefit to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Evidences from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for the efficiency of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) on the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are conflicting. Here we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs to evaluate the efficiency and safety of TCM in the treatment of NAFLD. Studies were searched on PubMed and China National Knowledge Infrastructure from January 1995 to June 2010. RCTs comparing either TCM formulations alone or in combination with placebo, ursodeoxycholic acid, insulin sensitizers, lipid-lowering drugs, or antioxidants were included. The category of most usually used herbs in the treatment of NAFLD was also calculated. Five thousand nine hundred and four patients from 62 RCTs were included for meta-analysis and 25,661 patients from 419 clinical studies were for TCM formulation analysis. Comparing with western medicines mentioned above, TCM had a better effect on the normalization of alanine aminotransferase and disappearance of radiological steatosis in the treatment of NAFLD. Furthermore, 246 kinds of Chinese herbs were included in our present study, with an average of 10 herbs (range 1-31) in each formulation. Hawthorn Fruit (321 times in 17,670 patients) was the most often used herb in the treatment of NAFLD. In conclusion, TCM is of modest benefit to the treatment of NAFLD.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Systematic review with meta-analysis: non-invasive assessment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease – the role of transient elastography and plasma cytokeratin-18 fragments

BACKGROUND: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects 15-40% of the general population. Some patients have non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and progressive fibrosis, and would be candidates for monitoring and treatment.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Meta-analysis: natural history of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and diagnostic accuracy of non-invasive tests for liver disease severity

BACKGROUND. NAFLD ranges from simple steatosis (SS) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The natural history of NAFLD and the optimal strategy to identify subjects with progressive liver disease are unclear. Objectives. To assess the evidence in: (1) natural history of NAFLD; and (2) non-invasive methods to differentiate NAFLD histological subtypes. DESIGN AND SETTING. Among 4185 articles published on MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Pubmed, national and International meeting abstracts through July 2010, 40 articles assessing the natural history of NAFLD and 32 articles evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of non-invasive tests against liver biopsy (LB) were included. MEASUREMENTS. Two reviewers retrieved articles and evaluated study quality by appropriate scores. Main outcomes were pooled using random- or fixed-effects models. RESULTS. NAFLD has an increased overall mortality (OR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.18-2.10), deriving from liver-related and cardiovascular disease, and a 2-fold risk of diabetes. Compared to SS, NASH has a higher liver-related (OR for NASH: 5.71, 2.31-14.13; OR for NASH with advanced fibrosis: 10.06, 4.35-23.25), but not cardiovascular mortality (OR: 0.91, 0.42-1.98). Three non-invasive methods received independent validation: pooled AUROC, sensitivity and specificity of cytokeratin-18 for NASH are 0.82 (0.78-0.88), 0.78 (0.64-0.92), 0.87 (0.77-0.98). For NASH with advanced fibrosis, pooled AUROC, sensitivity and specificity of NAFLD fibrosis score and Fibroscan are 0.85 (0.80-0.93), 0.90 (0.82-0.99), 0.97 (0.94-0.99) and 0.94 (0.90-0.99), 0.94 (0.88-0.99) and 0.95 (0.89-0.99). CONCLUSIONS. NAFLD warrants screening for cardio-metabolic risk and for progressive liver disease. The combination of three noninvasive tests with LB may optimally individuate patients with NASH, with or without advanced fibrosis.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Lifestyle interventions for the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in adults: a systematic review

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a serious and growing clinical problem. Despite lifestyle modification, i.e. diet and physical activity, being the recommended therapy, there are currently no systematic evaluations of its efficacy. This review applies a systematic approach to evaluating lifestyle modifications studied to date. Medline (Pubmed), Scopus, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register were searched for studies and study groups assessing the effect of diet, physical activity, and/or exercise modification in adult populations with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The outcome markers of interest were indicators of steatosis, histological evidence of inflammation and fibrosis, and glucose control/insulin sensitivity. We identified 23 studies for inclusion; seven had control groups, but only six were randomised. Eleven groups received diet-only interventions, two exercise-only, and 19 diet and physical activity/exercise. Studies consistently showed reductions in liver fat and/or liver aminotransferase concentration, with the strongest correlation being with weight reduction. Of the 5 studies reporting changes in histopathology, all showed a trend towards reduction in inflammation, in 2 this was statistically significant. Changes in fibrosis were less consistent with only one study showing a significant reduction. The majority of studies also reported improvements in glucose control/insulin sensitivity following intervention. However, study design, definition of disease, assessment methods, and interventions varied considerably across studies. Lifestyle modifications leading to weight reduction and/or increased physical activity consistently reduced liver fat and improved glucose control/insulin sensitivity. Limited data also suggest that lifestyle interventions may hold benefits for histopathology.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Omega-3 supplementation and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a frequent accompaniment of obesity and insulin resistance. With the prevalence approaching 85% in obese populations, new therapeutic approaches to manage NAFLD are warranted. A systematic search of the literature was conducted for studies pertaining to the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation on NAFLD in humans. Primary outcome measures were liver fat and liver function tests: alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase [1]. Data were pooled and meta-analyses conducted using a random effects model. Nine eligible studies, involving 355 individuals given either omega-3 PUFA or control treatment were included. Beneficial changes in liver fat favoured PUFA treatment (effect size=-0.97, 95% CI: -0.58 to -1.35, p<0.001). A benefit of PUFA vs. control was also observed for AST (effect size=-0.97, 95% CI: -0.13 to -1.82, p=0.02). There was a trend towards favouring PUFA treatment on ALT but this was not significant (effect size=-0.56, 95% CI: -1.16 to 0.03, p=0.06). Sub-analyses of only randomised control trials (RCTs) showed a significant benefit for PUFA vs. control on liver fat (effect size=-0.96, 95% CI: -0.43 to -1.48, p<0.001), but not for ALT (p=0.74) or AST (p=0.28). There was significant heterogeneity between studies. The pooled data suggest that omega-3 PUFA supplementation may decrease liver fat, however, the optimal dose is currently not known. Well designed RCTs which quantify the magnitude of effect of omega-3 PUFA supplementation on liver fat are needed.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (504)...

Systematic Review Methods in PubMed

See all (2)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...