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Tuberculous bacteria have been suggested as a possible cause of Crohn's disease due to a similarity between Crohn's and tuberculous lesions when viewed under a microscope. Four studies examined the use of anti‐tuberculous therapy to reduce the chance of the disease recurring in patients with non‐active Crohn's disease. The results of these studies suggest that this treatment might be effective for this purpose. However, this finding has not been definitively proven, and anti‐tuberculous therapy should not be used to treat Crohn's disease without further study.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Abdominal tuberculosis (TB) is a type of TB that affects the gut, the peritoneum (the lining of the abdominal cavity), abdominal lymph nodes, and, more rarely, the solid organs in the abdomen (liver, pancreas, and spleen). Abdominal TB leads to severe illness in adults and children, and can cause complications, such as bowel rupture, which can lead to death.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. Over two billion people worldwide are believed to be latently infected with TB and approximately 10% of these people will develop active TB later in life. The World Health Organization currently only recommend treatment with fluoroquinolones for patients who cannot take standard first‐line drugs. In this review, we examined the effect of including fluoroquinolones in first‐line treatment regimens on people with presumed drug‐sensitive tuberculosis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Tuberculosis (TB) is an important health problem, especially in developing countries. The treatment for pulmonary TB in new patients includes four oral medicines taken for six months, sometimes as fixed‐dose combinations (FDCs) that are combined in one tablet, or taken separately as single‐drug formulations. The World Health Organization recommends prescribers use fixed‐dose combinations to reduce the number of tablets that people take. On the supply side, this might reduce prescribing errors and improve drug supply efficiency; on the patient's side, FDCS simplify treatment and improve adherence.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

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