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An overactive bladder is a condition in which bladder contracts suddenly without any control, resulting in feeling to urinate and or leakage of urine. This is a common condition in adults and is also called as 'irritable' bladder or detrusor instability, urge or urgency‐frequency syndrome. Overactive bladder becomes more common with advancing age. Anticholinergic drugs mainly by their muscle relaxant action can help adults with symptoms of urinary frequency, urgency and urge incontinence.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

This guideline covers the physical, emotional, social and spiritual elements of end of life care, and focuses on improving the child or young person’s quality of life and supporting their family and carers. There are, for instance, recommendations on managing distressing symptoms and providing care and bereavement support after death. Recommendations have also been made about how services should be delivered. The guideline is aimed at all providers of paediatric end of life care, whatever their level of practise, and also for children and young people with life-limiting conditions and their parents or carers.

NICE Guideline - National Guideline Alliance (UK).

Version: December 2016

The authors concluded that anticholinergics appear safe in men with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hypertrophy, but more research is required to evaluate their efficacy. The authors’ cautious conclusions appear to reflect the evidence from a small number of studies, but the poor reporting of review methods means that the reliability of the conclusion is unclear.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2007

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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