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Results: 19

Doxycycline for osteoarthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of doxycycline on osteoarthritis. After searching for all relevant studies, they found two studies with 663 people.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Doxycycline plus ivermectin for preventing and treating river blindness (onchocerciasis)

We reviewed the evidence on the effect of adding doxycycline to ivermectin, the usual treatment for people with river blindness (RB). RB also is known as onchocerciasis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Antibiotics for treating human brucellosis

Brucellosis is a common infection caused by Brucella bacteria species and can infect both people and animals. It is spread by eating infected food products and through direct contact with infected animals. The bacterial infection can affect different tissues and organs and is treated using antibiotics. Current recommended treatment regimens involve the use of two or more antibiotics in order to avoid relapses occurring and to prevent prolonged use of these drugs, which may lead to problems of drug resistance arising. Drug resistance is a particularly important issue as most people infected with brucellosis live in low socioeconomic areas of developing countries, where tuberculosis is also an endemic health problem. Thus there are concerns over the potential increase in resistance to tuberculosis drugs due to their prolonged use in treating brucellosis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Drug treatment for small abdominal aortic aneurysms

An aneurysm is an abnormal localised widening (dilatation) of an artery. The most common place for such a dilatation is the abdominal aorta. This is the main artery linking the heart to the lower limbs and the organs of the abdomen, and a dilatation here is termed an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). About 4% of men over 55 years of age have an AAA, but it is less common in women. Aneurysms over 55 mm in diameter carry a high risk of rupture, and rupture carries a high risk of death. To reduce the risks, screening programmes using ultrasound scanning have been introduced for selected groups in a number of countries. Patients with aneurysms over 55 mm are then evaluated for elective aneurysm repair. For aneurysms at or below the 55 mm cut‐off, the current treatment is 'watchful waiting', where the aneurysm is repeatedly scanned over time to see if it is enlarging. This review aimed to identify medical treatments which could slow or even reverse aneurysm growth, and thus delay or avoid the need for elective surgery.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Use of antibiotics may or may not prevent leptospirosis

This is a systematic review of clinical research testing whether taking the antibiotic can prevent infection from a water‐borne bacteria called Leptospira. Data from different trials had conflicting results, and these trials targeted different kinds of people ‐ travellers and people who live in at risk areas, encompassing soldiers, farmers, and students. Taken together, the data does not support the practice in all cases, though short term travellers with a potential for high risk exposure may be helped. People who took doxycycline were more likely to have stomach pain, nausea, and vomiting but the medication had to be stopped in only a few participants.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Antibiotics for the treatment of leptospirosis

Leptospirosis is a common disease both in the developed and developing world. It is caused by a bacteria spread by the urine of animals. People travelling, agricultural field workers, hunters, homeless, and others with close animal contact are groups that, in particular, can get leptospirosis. Like many common infections, most people infected with this disease do not feel sick. When people do feel sick, in some instances up to 1 out of every 10 people have died. Whether or not antibiotics should be used, and if used which antibiotic should be used have been matters for debate for many years. This review identified and assessed seven clinical trials that tested antibiotics in patients sick with leptospirosis. Four of these trials compared intravenous penicillin to a placebo. Three of the trials looked at differences between different antibiotics. All trials had high risk of systematic errors (bias) and of random errors (play of chance). When looked at together, these trials do not answer the basic questions about whether or not antibiotics should be used. Part of the reason for this is that there is a wide range of severity among people ill with the disease. Additional randomised clinical trials are needed. Nonetheless, these trials suggest that antibiotics administered to patients who are sick with leptospirosis may make patients feel better two days earlier than they otherwise would have improved. However, it is also possible that when patients are severely ill, penicillin therapy might increase the risk of death or dialysis in comparison to those who receive no antibiotics. Other antibiotics have not been tested in this way. Despite the lack of evidence, if a clinician chooses to treat leptospirosis with an antibiotic, there does not seem to be any difference between the appropriate use of intravenous penicillin, intravenous cephalosporin, doxycyline, or azithromycin. But, for this they have not been tested to the same extent as intravenous penicillin.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Treatments for rosacea

Rosacea is a common skin condition causing flushing, redness, red pimples and pustules on the face, and should not be confused with acne. Dilated blood vessels may appear near the surface of the skin (telangiectasia). It can also cause inflammation of the eyes or eyelids, or both (ocular rosacea). Some people can develop a thickening of the skin, especially of the nose (rhinophyma). Although the cause of rosacea remains unclear, a wide variety of treatments are available for this persistent (chronic) and recurring and often distressing disease. These include medications applied directly to the skin (topical), oral medications and light‐based therapies. We wanted to discover how people assessed their treatments: if the treatments changed their quality of life, if they saw changes in their condition and if there were side effects. From the doctors, we wanted to discover whether treatments changed the severity of rosacea, as well as how long it took before symptoms reduced and reappeared.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2017

Which rosacea medications are proven to be effective?

Skin creams containing metronidazole or azelaic acid can help relieve the symptoms of rosacea like skin redness. The same is probably true for medications containing the antibiotic doxycycline.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: August 14, 2014

Treatment for the neurological complications of Lyme disease

In humans, a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi causes Lyme disease. People become infected when bitten by ticks carrying the bacterium. The person may experience symptoms in the joints, skin, muscles, and nervous system (peripheral nerves (nerves outside the brain and spinal cord), the brain, and the spinal cord). Without antibiotic treatment, neurological Lyme disease either may resolve or cause long‐term problems. Neurological Lyme disease differs between Europe and the United States, probably because of differences in B. burgdorferi. Limited information exists about which antibiotics are better for the treatment of neurological Lyme disease.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2017

Interventions for the management of fluid around the lungs (pleural fluid) caused by cancer

We reviewed the evidence about the effectiveness of different methods to manage fluid around the lung in patients with a build up of this fluid caused by cancer.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Antibiotics for treating scrub typhus

Scrub typhus is transmitted by chiggers (mites), is a bacterial infection and causes fever and a typical sore on the skin, and is common in the western Pacific region and many parts of Asia, particularly in agricultural workers and travellers in areas where the disease is common, particularly people camping, rafting, or trekking . This review summarize the information from seven small trials about the effects of antibiotics on scrub typhus. Most of the antibiotics tested worked: this includes: doxycycline, tetracycline, telithromycin and azithromycin. Rifampicin seem to be more effective than doxycycline in areas where scrub typhus appears to respond poorly to standard anti‐rickettsial drugs.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Interventions for treating melioidosis

Plain language summary pending.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Antibiotics for prevention with IUDs

An intrauterine device (IUD) is a small device placed in the womb for long‐term birth control. Many people worry about the woman getting pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) with an IUD. This infection can lead to problems in getting pregnant. If PID occurs, it is often within the first few weeks. Antibiotics are sometimes used before inserting an IUD to prevent an infection. This review looked at how well these preventive drugs reduced problems. Such problems include PID, extra health care visits, and stopping IUD use in three months.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Interventions to treat chronic infection of the prostate gland (chronic bacterial prostatitis)

Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) involves infection and inflammation of the prostate gland in men of all ages. It can cause problems urinating, including discomfort and pain, increased frequency and urge, or problems emptying the bladder. Bacteria infecting the prostate are the cause of CBP. These bacteria may be sexually transmitted. To cure CBP, antibiotics must be administered for extended periods of time (four weeks or longer), but a permanent cure is not always guaranteed. Other drugs may be combined with antibiotics to improve CBP symptoms. This review found that fluoroquinolones like ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, lomefloxacin, ofloxacin or prulifloxacin have equivalent effects and equivalent success rates in CBP patients. If atypical bacteria like chlamydia are suspected to cause CBP, macrolide antibiotics such as azithromycin may achieve better results compared to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. It must be taken into account that some of the studies that have been performed are of poor quality or have been performed on small numbers of participants. More studies are needed, focusing on new agents or on optimized doses of currently prescribed antibiotics.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Avoiding and treating rosacea

If you avoid rosacea triggers, you may be able to prevent outbreaks of inflammation. The condition can be treated with creams or gels, and by taking medication.Rosacea is a common, often chronic inflammation of facial skin. It causes red patches of skin on your face, tiny visible blood vessels and spots, which come and go. Over time, people often discover that certain things trigger their outbreaks. These might include certain foods, alcohol, cosmetics or medications, but different people often have different triggers. Sunlight also plays a role. Although the effects of sunlight on rosacea symptoms vary from person to person, sunburn is hard on your skin and may even harm it.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: August 14, 2014

Antibiotics for treating cholera

Cochrane Collaboration researchers conducted a review of the effects of antibiotics for treating people with cholera. After searching for relevant trials, they included 39 randomized controlled trials enrolling 4623 people with cholera.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Treatment for pelvic inflammatory disease

We assessed the effectiveness and safety of different treatments for pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) that are recommended for consideration by current clinical guidelines for treatment of PID (the 2015 US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for treatment of PID).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2017

Evaluation of treatments for vaginal bleeding induced by progestin‐only contraceptives

As the use of progestin‐only methods of contraception continues to increase worldwide, the problem of vaginal bleeding disturbances these methods induce is becoming of increasing public health relevance.Since this adverse effect limits method's acceptability, and leads to loss of compliance. Some women may benefit to some degree from some interventions tested. However the evidence reviewed is not strong enough to recommend routine use of any of the regimens included in the trials, particularly for long‐term effects. Positive results need to be reproduced in larger scale trials.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Minocycline for acne vulgaris: efficacy and safety

Acne is the most common skin disease of adolescence, and in most cases it clears spontaneously. However, in some people it persists in to adulthood. There are many different treatment options, but there is little good evidence to inform doctors and individuals about which to choose.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

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