Home > Search Results

Results: 20

Clear

Evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to establish the beneficial and harmful effects of drugs altering blood clotting for treating disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in pregnant women and following birth is lacking.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

We reviewed the clinical benefits and harms of anticoagulant and antifibrinolytic therapy for treating disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in patients with acute or chronic leukemia.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Many snake venoms cause coagulopathy in humans. Coagulopathy is a condition in which the person’s blood is unable to clot because the venom causes decreased levels of clotting factors. Coagulopathy increases the risk of bleeding. Antivenom is a treatment used to neutralise venom in people who have been bitten by a snake. There is some evidence from observational studies in humans which suggest that snake antivenom is helpful to people who have been bitten by a snake. However, the use of antivenom has some risks, and can cause allergic reactions.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) is a novel hemostatic agent, originally developed for the treatment of hemorrhage in hemophiliacs with inhibitors, which has been successfully used recently in an increasing number of nonhemophilic bleeding conditions. In the present systematic review we report the existing literature data on the use of this hemostatic agent in severe bleeding, unresponsive to standard treatment, associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation. A total of 99 disseminated intravascular coagulation-associated bleeding episodes treated with rFVIIa were collected from 27 published articles: in the majority of the cases, the underlying disorder complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation was a postpartum hemorrhage, while in the remaining cases it was a cancer, trauma, sepsis or liver failure. Although limited, the data available suggest that rFVIIa could have a potential role in this clinical setting. Large randomized trials are needed, however, to confirm the preliminary results and to assess the safety and dosing regimens of this agent in refractory bleeding associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2007

This review concluded that antithrombin may increase survival in patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation due to severe sepsis, but there was insufficient evidence to make recommendations for clinical practice. The authors' tentative conclusions appear appropriate in view of the limited evidence, but poor reporting of the review methods makes it difficult to assess the review's reliability.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2006

Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) are recommended as the treatment of choice in warfarin-related coagulopathy. However, the risk of thromboembolic complications associated with their use is not well defined. We performed a meta-analysis to estimate the rate of thromboembolic complications in patients receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) treated with PCCs for bleeding or before urgent surgery. Medline and Embase databases were searched. Two reviewers performed study selection and extracted data independently. Studies providing data on incidence of thromboembolic complications in VKA-treated patients were eligible for the study. Weighted mean proportion of the rate of thromboembolic complications and the mortality rate were calculated. Twenty-seven studies (1,032 patients) were included. Seven studies used 3-factor, and 20 4-factor PCCs. Twelve patients had a thromboembolic complication (weighted mean 1.4%; 95% CI 0.8-2.1), of which two were fatal. The incidence of thromboembolic events was 1.8% (95% CI 1.0-3.0) in patients treated with 4-factor PCCs, and 0.7% (95% CI 0.0-2.4) in patients treated with 3-factor PCCs. Total mortality rate was 10.6% (95% CI 5.9-16.6). In conclusion, our results suggest there is a low but quantifiable risk of thromboembolism in VKA-treated patients receiving PCCs for anticoagulation reversal. These findings should be confirmed in randomised, controlled trials.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Sepsis is a clinical syndrome caused by the body's immune and coagulation systems being switched on by an infection. Sepsis with shock is a life-threatening condition that is characterised by low blood pressure despite adequate fluid replacement, and organ dysfunction or failure. Sepsis is an important cause of death in people of all ages. Both a UK Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman enquiry (2013) and UK National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD, 2015) have recently highlighted sepsis as being a leading cause of avoidable death that kills more people than breast, bowel and prostate cancer combined.

NICE Guideline - National Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: July 2016

This report evaluates the level of evidence currently available to support the effectiveness and safety of using recombinant activated coagulation factor VII (rFVIIa) for clinical indications not approved by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). rFVIIa is approved for a variety of uses in hemophilia patients who have developed antibody inhibitors that compromise the use of standard factor replacement. Use of this costly biologic product has expanded beyond these hemophilia-related indications to encompass a range of off-label uses, most of which are in-hospital uses. These uses differ substantially from the drug’s FDA approved label. The purpose of this report is two-fold: (1) To document the full range of clinical indications for which rFVIIa is being used and the types of studies available to evaluate these uses and (2) To provide a comparative effectiveness review of rFVIIa vs. usual care for several in-hospital clinical indications: intracranial hemorrhage, massive bleeding secondary to trauma, and the selected surgical procedures of cardiac surgery, liver transplantation, and prostatectomy.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: May 2010

This clinical guideline concerns the management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and their complications from preconception to the postnatal period. For the purpose of this guideline, ‘pregnancy’ includes the antenatal, intrapartum and postpartum (6 weeks after birth) periods. The guideline has been developed with the aim of providing guidance in the following areas: information and advice for women who have chronic hypertension and are pregnant or planning to become pregnant; information and advice for women who are pregnant and at increased risk of developing hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; management of pregnancy with chronic hypertension; management of pregnancy in women with gestational hypertension; management of pregnancy for women with pre-eclampsia before admission to critical care level 2 setting; management of pre-eclampsia and its complications in a critical care setting; information, advice and support for women and healthcare professionals after discharge to primary care following a pregnancy complicated by hypertension; care of the fetus during pregnancy complicated by a hypertensive disorder.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: August 2010

This guideline contains recommendations about general principles of blood transfusion, and applies to a range of conditions and different settings. It does not include recommendations relating to specific conditions and provides guidance on:

NICE Guideline - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: November 2015

To systematically review evidence addressing the management of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) ), including evidence for the benefits and harms of nonsurgical and surgical treatments, interventions for anemia after PPH is resolved, and effects of systems-level interventions.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 2015

Mental, neurological and substance use (MNS) disorders are highly prevalent, accounting for a substantial burden of disease and disability globally. In order to bridge the gap between available resources and the significant need for services, the World Health Organization launched the Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP). The objective of mhGAP is to scale-up care and services using evidence-based interventions for prevention and management of priority MNS conditions. The mhGAP Intervention Guide version 1.0 for MNS disorders for non-specialist health settings was developed in 2010 as a simple technical tool to allow for integrated management of priority MNS conditions using protocols for clinical decision-making.

World Health Organization.

Version: 2016

Sepsis is a syndrome characterised by a systemic inflammatory response to infection that leads to rapid acute organ failure and potentially rapid decline to death. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a blood product derived from human donor blood, has been proposed as an adjuvant therapy for sepsis.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: February 2012

Antithrombin is a small particle produced by the liver. It deactivates several substances which affect the ability of the blood to form clots. Its activity is increased many‐fold by the drug heparin, which enhances the binding of antithrombin to clotting factors so that the blood does not form clots. Antithrombin also reduces inflammation in the human body. Inflammation is the body's attempt at self protection to remove harmful stimuli and begin healing processes. Inflammation is thus not always a bad process.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

We evaluated the evidence about whether giving antifibrinolytics (tranexamic acid or epsilon‐aminocaproic acid) to people with a low platelet count prevents bleeding and whether these antifibrinolytics are associated with side effects. Our target population was people with haematological disorders who have a low platelet count and would usually be treated with platelet transfusions. We did not include people with immune thrombocytopenia because they are not usually treated with platelet transfusions.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

This guideline covers bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia, focusing on management of these conditions in children and young people aged younger than 16 years in primary and secondary care, and using evidence of direct relevance to these age groups where available.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: 2010

Early-onset neonatal bacterial infection (infection with onset within 72 hours of birth) is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in newborn babies. Parent organisations and the scientific literature report that there can be unnecessary delays in recognising and treating sick babies. In addition, concern about the possibility of early-onset neonatal infection is common. This concern is an important influence on the care given to pregnant women and newborn babies. There is wide variation in how the risk of early-onset neonatal infection is managed in healthy babies. The approach taken by the NHS needs to: prioritise the treatment of sick babies, minimise the impact of management pathways on healthy women and babies, use antibiotics wisely to avoid the development of resistance to antibiotics. These drivers have not always been addressed consistently in the NHS, and this guideline was commissioned to ensure they would be addressed in future.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: August 2012

The guideline is intended to cover the care of healthy women with uncomplicated pregnancies entering labour at low risk of developing intrapartum complications. In addition, recommendations are included that address the care of women who start labour as ‘low risk’ but who go on to develop complications. These include the care of women with prelabour rupture of membranes at term, care of the woman and baby when meconium is present, indications for continuous cardiotocography, interpretation of cardiotocography traces, and management of retained placenta and postpartum haemorrhage. Aspects of intrapartum care for women at risk of developing intrapartum complications are covered by a range of guidelines on specific conditions (see section 1.8) and a further guideline is planned on intrapartum care of women ‘at high risk’ of complications during pregnancy and the intrapartum period.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: December 2014

Expert-reviewed information summary about oral complications, such as mucositis and salivary gland dysfunction, that occur in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy to the head and neck.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: December 16, 2016

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of adult acute myeloid leukemia.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: January 20, 2017

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (35)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...