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This well-conducted review concluded that there was insufficient evidence to support the use of colour vision testing alone, or in combination with retinal photography, as a method for screening for retinopathy in patients with diabetes. Given the paucity of good quality evidence, the authors' conclusion seems appropriate and reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

To update a prior systematic review on the effects of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FA) on maternal and child health and to assess the evidence for their effects on, and associations with, additional outcomes.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: October 2016

In 2009, approximately 3.5 million people sought treatment related to a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the United States (U.S.), just over 1% of the U.S. population. Researchers estimate that approximately 15% of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND) U.S. Service Members have incurred TBI during deployment. This equates to 390,000 of the 2.6 million Service Members who have deployed as of 2014. Given that intact visual functioning depends on portions of the brain interacting in complex ways, there are multiple potential mechanisms through which TBI can result in visual dysfunction. To provide relevant data for policymakers, optometrists, ophthalmologists, rehabilitation specialists, and others who provide services for Veterans with TBI history, we conducted a systematic review of the prevalence and types of visual dysfunction in individuals with a history of TBI.

Evidence-based Synthesis Program - Department of Veterans Affairs (US).

Version: September 2014

Impaired visual acuity is common in preschool-aged children. Screening for impaired visual acuity in primary care settings could identify children with vision problems at a critical period of visual development and lead to interventions to improve vision, function, and quality of life.

Evidence Syntheses - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: February 2011

This guideline covers adults (18 and older) with a diagnosis of chronic open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension and those with chronic open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension associated with pseudoexfoliation or pigment dispersion. In addition, the guideline will cover populations who have a higher prevalence of glaucoma and may have worse clinical outcomes including people with a family history of glaucoma, younger people (<50 years) and people who are of black African or black Caribbean descent. Options for pharmacological, surgical, laser and complimentary or alternative treatments are considered in terms of clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Acute Care (UK).

Version: April 2009

The review found insufficient evidence to recommend that pan-retinal photocoagulation is used at the non-proliferative stage of diabetic retinopathy.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: July 2015

The systematic review found that, using the best available data, second-eye cataract surgery was associated with clinically meaningful improvement in stereopsis but did not affect other clinical measures of vision or of health-related quality of life, apart from improvements in a mental health measure in one trial. There are limitations in the evidence, however, including a lack of quality of life assessments in some trials and patients’ baseline vision before surgery being relatively good, limiting room for improvement. Further data are needed from a well-conducted randomised controlled trial that reflects current populations and enables the estimation of health-state utility values.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: November 2014

Type 1 diabetes affects over 370,000 adults in the UK, representing approximately 10% of adults diagnosed with diabetes. Given the complexity of its treatment regimens, successful outcomes depend, perhaps more than with any other long-term condition, on full engagement of the adult with type 1 diabetes in life-long day-by-day self-management. In order to support this, the health service needs to provide informed, expert support, education and training as well as a range of other more conventional biomedical services and interventionsfor the prevention and management of long term complications and disability.

NICE Guideline - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: August 2015

The objective of this report is to perform a systematic review of the beneficial and harmful effects of ocriplasmin for the treatment of symptomatic vitreomacular adhesion (sVMA).

Common Drug Review - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: January 2014

A multidisciplinary rehabilitation package was developed for use following hip fracture and a feasibility randomised controlled trial identified methods for definitive evaluation.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: August 2017

Falls represent an important source of preventable morbidity and mortality in older adults, the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population. We undertook a systematic review of falls interventions applicable to primary care populations to inform the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force’s (USPSTF’s) updated recommendation on preventing falls in older adults.

Evidence Syntheses - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: December 2010

Impaired visual acuity is common in older adults. In 2009, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) found insufficient evidence to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for visual acuity in older adults (I statement).

Evidence Syntheses - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: March 2016

The original antenatal care guideline was published by NICE in 2003. Since then a number of important pieces of evidence have become available, particularly concerning gestational diabetes, haemoglobinopathy and ultrasound, so that the update was initiated. This update has also provided an opportunity to look at a number of aspects of antenatal care: the development of a method to assess women for whom additional care is necessary (the ‘antenatal assessment tool’), information giving to women, lifestyle (vitamin D supplementation, alcohol consumption), screening for the baby (use of ultrasound for gestational age assessment and screening for fetal abnormalities, methods for determining normal fetal growth, placenta praevia), and screening for the mother (haemoglobinopathy screening, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and preterm labour, chlamydia).

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: March 2008

The treatment of cancer may cause health problems (late effects) for childhood cancer survivors months or years after successful treatment has ended. Get information about the long-term physical, psychological and social effects of treatment for childhood cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: April 25, 2017

This guideline is a partial update of ‘The epilepsies: the diagnosis and management of the epilepsies in adults and children in primary and secondary care’ (NICE clinical guideline 20, 2004). It updates the pharmacological management sections of the 2004 guideline and also includes the use of the ketogenic diet.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: January 2012

To systematically review evidence addressing the diagnosis and management of infantile hemangiomas (IH).

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: January 2016

This clinical guideline concerns the management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and their complications from preconception to the postnatal period. For the purpose of this guideline, ‘pregnancy’ includes the antenatal, intrapartum and postpartum (6 weeks after birth) periods. The guideline has been developed with the aim of providing guidance in the following areas: information and advice for women who have chronic hypertension and are pregnant or planning to become pregnant; information and advice for women who are pregnant and at increased risk of developing hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; management of pregnancy with chronic hypertension; management of pregnancy in women with gestational hypertension; management of pregnancy for women with pre-eclampsia before admission to critical care level 2 setting; management of pre-eclampsia and its complications in a critical care setting; information, advice and support for women and healthcare professionals after discharge to primary care following a pregnancy complicated by hypertension; care of the fetus during pregnancy complicated by a hypertensive disorder.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: August 2010

Study found that, transthoracic echocardiography in second harmonic imaging mode is a cost-effective use of NHS resources in those cases where clinicians deem it the most appropriate method of testing to identify cardiac sources of stroke and transient ischaemic attack. However, the study highlights that there is a lack of evidence in several areas and the results of the economic evaluation should be treated with caution.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: March 2014

Clinical guidelines have been defined as ‘systematically developed statements which assist clinicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate treatment for specific conditions’. This clinical guideline concerns the management of diabetes and its complications from preconception to the postnatal period. It has been developed with the aim of providing guidance on:

NICE Guideline - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: February 2015

For many people faecal incontinence is the result of a complex interplay of contributing factors, many of which can co-exist. Some may be relatively simple to reverse.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Acute Care (UK).

Version: 2007

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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