Home > Search Results

Results: 1 to 20 of 130

Clear

Bibliographic details: Jung Y.  Percutaneous left ventricular assist device: a systematic review. Journal of the Korean Medical Association 2014; 57(11): 949-956

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Heart failure is defined as reduced ability of the heart to pump blood and maintain normal bodily function. Heart transplantation is currently the preferred treatment for end-stage heart failure but the supply of donor hearts is insufficient to meet the need and many patients are not eligible for transplantation due to age or comorbid conditions.

Evidence-based Synthesis Program - Department of Veterans Affairs (US).

Version: May 2012

This study found that while pulsatile ventricular assist devices used as bridge to heart transplant for advanced heart failure were clinically effective compared with medical management using inotropes, they failed to reach the standard level of cost-effectiveness set by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. It is clear that the technology is improving and currently in the base-case analysis over a lifetime horizon, cost-effectiveness approaches that for interventions adopted by the NHS as end of life treatments..

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: November 2013

BACKGROUND: For patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting transplantation, lack of donor organs has created an increased need for alternatives such as left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. The purpose of this study is to determine safe and effective exercise parameters for physical therapy in the acute care setting.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

BACKGROUND: Conveying the complex trade-offs of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices is challenging and made more difficult by absence of an evidence summary for the full range of possible outcomes. We aimed to summarize the current evidence on outcomes of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

The need for this guideline was identified as the NICE guidelines on chronic heart failure were being updated. We recognised at this time that there were important aspects of the diagnosis and management of acute heart failure that were not being addressed by the chronic heart failure guideline, which focussed on long term management rather than the immediate care of someone who is acutely unwell as a result of heart failure. The aim of this guideline is to provide guidance to the NHS on the diagnosis and management of acute heart failure.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: October 2014

Heart failure is an increasing health problem in England and Wales. Its incidence and prevalence are increasing, leading to frequent admissions to hospital and long-term drug costs. Concerns about the effects on the duration and quality of life of people and costs upon the NHS have resulted in several government policy initiatives. End-stage heart failure (ESHF) is associated with major disability and a poor prognosis. Heart transplantation has become the accepted form of treatment for people with ESHF, improving survival and patient quality of life. With continued decreases in organ donation in England and Wales, it is an option available to few. Mechanical circulatory support through left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) has attracted increased interest as an option for patients with ESHF whether as a bridge to heart transplantation (BTT), as a bridge to myocardial recovery (BTR) or as a long-term chronic support (LTCS). Continued developments of LVADs, declining costs and improvements in associated care have made their wider use a reality.

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: 2005

1) Identify validated decision aids available for insertion, continuation, or deactivation of electronic cardiac devices (ECDs); 2) Review evidence on the effectiveness of decision aids for promoting informed decisionmaking and their relevance to the Medicare population; 3) Identify barriers to use of decision aids.

Technology Assessment Report - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: May 23, 2012

Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are increasingly being used as a bridge to heart transplantation or destination therapy. It is unclear which antithrombotic regimen should be used to reduce the risk of stroke. We systematically reviewed the literature on all types of antithrombotic regimens and stroke in patients with any type of LVADs. Our primary outcome measure was the mean incidence of any type of stroke. Twenty-six articles were selected as relevant, comprehending 1989 patients with a mean LVAD support of 200 days (range 30-621). The mean proportion of patients affected with stroke was 20% (range 0-55%), with a mean incidence of 0.74 (range 0-6.91) events/patient-year. Support with HeartMate II and a regimen of postoperative heparin converted to coumarins, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and dipyridamole resulted in 0.17 (mean; range 0.06-0.29) strokes/patient-year. HeartMate II support and the same regime without heparin was associated with 0.07 (mean; range 0.03-0.11) strokes/patient-year. A Novacor device with heparin, converted to coumarins, was associated with 3.82 (mean; range 1.03-6.91) strokes/patient-year, while ASA added to this regime resulted in 0.97 ischaemic strokes/patient-year (mean; range 0.53-1.48). Other combinations of assist devices and antithrombotic regimes were investigated in one or two studies only. This systematic review provides risk estimates for stroke for various LVADs and antithrombotic regimes. Our findings indicate that the postoperative use of heparin in HeartMate II patients is doubtful, and suggest an important role for antiplatelet drugs to prevent stroke in patients supported with a Novacor device.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

AIMS: Ventricular assist device (VAD) therapy is widely used as a bridge to cardiac transplant. Studies addressing the effect of VADs on post-transplant outcomes have shown conflicting results. It is imperative to review this evidence to inform clinical decision making and future research. Our aim was to systematically evaluate the effect of VAD therapy on long-term post-transplant outcomes in heart transplant recipients.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

BACKGROUND: Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are becoming an increasingly viable alternative therapy for heart failure, either as a bridge to heart transplantation (BTT) or destination therapy (DT). The latter has become increasingly popular in recent years, in the face of a donor organ shortage and a rise in elderly patients ineligible for heart transplants. For these patients in particular, device durability is a key contributor to survival, morbidity, and quality of life. This systematic review aimed to assess the long-term durability of current continuous-flow LVADs.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

BACKGROUND: Advanced heart failure (HF) is a debilitating condition for which heart transplant (HT) offers the best treatment option. However, the supply of donor hearts is diminishing and demand greatly exceeds supply. Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are surgically implanted pumps used as an alternative to transplant (ATT) or as a bridge to transplant (BTT) while a patient awaits a donor heart. Surgery and VADs are costly. For the NHS to allocate and deliver such services in a cost-effective way the relative costs and benefits of these alternative treatments need to be estimated.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Despite a significant number of published systematic reviews of implantable medical devices, no empirical evaluation of the reviews has been performed. We conducted a critical appraisal of the quality of reporting in systematic reviews of implantable medical devices to understand the methodologies used; identify current strengths, limitations, deficiencies, and unique challenges; and make recommendations to improve future conduct and reporting.

Methods Research Reports - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: November 2012

Study found that implantable cardiac defibrillators reduced all-cause mortality in people at increased risk of sudden cardiac death as a result of previous ventricular arrhythmias or cardiac arrest, remote myocardial infarction or ischaemic/non-ischaemic heart failure and LVEF ≤ 35%. Cardiac resynchronisation therapy reduced all-cause mortality and improved other outcomes in people with heart failure as a result of left ventricular systolic dysfunction and cardiac dyssynchrony when compared with optimal pharmacological therapy. The devices were cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay threshold of £30,000 when compared with optimal pharmacological therapy.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: August 2014

The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of eplerenone 25 mg to 50 mg daily for the treatment of patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II systolic chronic heart failure (HF) and left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

Common Drug Review - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: October 2014

This review looked at the use of ventricular assist devices in people with end-stage heart failure. The authors found that the level of evidence available was limited but, for adults waiting for heart transplant, the devices appeared to have a beneficial effect on survival rates. The evidence regarding children was more limited, but the results appeared similar to those for adults.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2004

The study found that viscoelastic testing may be effective in reducing the numbers of cardiac surgery patients receiving red blood cell transfusion, platelet transfusion and fresh frozen plasma transfusion, compared with a management strategy based on standard laboratory tests.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: July 2015

OBJECTIVES: To assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) as a bridge to heart transplantation (BTT), as a bridge to myocardial recovery (BTR) or as a long-term chronic support (LTCS) for people with end-stage heart failure (ESHF).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

This review investigated how cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) combined with implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy affects mortality in patients with left ventricular impairment and heart failure. Combined CRT and ICD therapy reduced mortality in comparison with medical therapy, but did not improve mortality when compared with CRT or ICD therapy alone. This study was generally well conducted and the authors' conclusions are supported by the evidence provided.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2007

A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol to determine whether there is evidence that cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by compressing the chest is safe and effective in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). Manufacturers warn of a possible risk of device dislodgement if the chest is compressed. AMED, EMBASE, MEDLINE, BNI and CINAHL were searched from inception to March 2014. Animal studies, case reports, case series, case-control studies, randomized controlled studies and systematic reviews were eligible for inclusion. Opinion articles with no reference to data were excluded. Of 45 unique results, 3 articles merited inclusion. A total of 10 patients with LVADs received chest compression during resuscitation. There was no report of device dislodgement as judged by postarrest flow rate, autopsy and resumption of effective circulation and/or neurological function. The longest duration of chest compression was 150 min. However, there are no comparisons of the efficacy of chest compressions relative to alternative means of external CPR, such as abdominal-only compressions. The absence of high-quality data precludes definitive recommendation of any particular form of CPR, in patients with LVADs. However, data identified suggest that chest compression is not as unsafe as previously thought. The efficacy of chest compressions in this patient population has not yet been investigated. Further research is required to address both the safety and efficacy of chest compressions in this population. Urgent presentation and publication of further evidence will inform future guidance.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (231)...

Systematic Review Methods in PubMed

See all (2)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...