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Hypertension in Pregnancy: The Management of Hypertensive Disorders During Pregnancy

This clinical guideline concerns the management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and their complications from preconception to the postnatal period. For the purpose of this guideline, ‘pregnancy’ includes the antenatal, intrapartum and postpartum (6 weeks after birth) periods. The guideline has been developed with the aim of providing guidance in the following areas: information and advice for women who have chronic hypertension and are pregnant or planning to become pregnant; information and advice for women who are pregnant and at increased risk of developing hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; management of pregnancy with chronic hypertension; management of pregnancy in women with gestational hypertension; management of pregnancy for women with pre-eclampsia before admission to critical care level 2 setting; management of pre-eclampsia and its complications in a critical care setting; information, advice and support for women and healthcare professionals after discharge to primary care following a pregnancy complicated by hypertension; care of the fetus during pregnancy complicated by a hypertensive disorder.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: August 2010
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Antenatal Care: Routine Care for the Healthy Pregnant Woman

The original antenatal care guideline was published by NICE in 2003. Since then a number of important pieces of evidence have become available, particularly concerning gestational diabetes, haemoglobinopathy and ultrasound, so that the update was initiated. This update has also provided an opportunity to look at a number of aspects of antenatal care: the development of a method to assess women for whom additional care is necessary (the ‘antenatal assessment tool’), information giving to women, lifestyle (vitamin D supplementation, alcohol consumption), screening for the baby (use of ultrasound for gestational age assessment and screening for fetal abnormalities, methods for determining normal fetal growth, placenta praevia), and screening for the mother (haemoglobinopathy screening, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and preterm labour, chlamydia).

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: March 2008
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Diabetes in Pregnancy: Management of Diabetes and Its Complications from Preconception to the Postnatal Period

Clinical guidelines have been defined as ‘systematically developed statements which assist clinicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate treatment for specific conditions’. This clinical guideline concerns the management of diabetes and its complications from preconception to the postnatal period. It has been developed with the aim of providing guidance on:

NICE Guideline - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: February 2015
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Preterm Labour and Birth

This guideline reviews the evidence for the care of women who present with signs and symptoms of preterm labour and those who are scheduled to have a preterm birth. It also reviews how preterm birth can be optimally diagnosed in symptomatic women, given that many women thought to be in preterm labour when clinically assessed will not deliver preterm. Optimal diagnosis can facilitate transfer to a place where appropriate neonatal intensive care can be provided, a strategy known to improve rates of survival for the baby. Additional areas that will be covered by the guidance (such as information needs for women who presents with signs and symptoms of preterm labour) are outlined in the guideline scope.

NICE Guideline - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: November 2015
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Intrapartum Care: Care of Healthy Women and Their Babies During Childbirth

The guideline is intended to cover the care of healthy women with uncomplicated pregnancies entering labour at low risk of developing intrapartum complications. In addition, recommendations are included that address the care of women who start labour as ‘low risk’ but who go on to develop complications. These include the care of women with prelabour rupture of membranes at term, care of the woman and baby when meconium is present, indications for continuous cardiotocography, interpretation of cardiotocography traces, and management of retained placenta and postpartum haemorrhage. Aspects of intrapartum care for women at risk of developing intrapartum complications are covered by a range of guidelines on specific conditions (see section 1.8) and a further guideline is planned on intrapartum care of women ‘at high risk’ of complications during pregnancy and the intrapartum period.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: December 2014
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Multiple Pregnancy: The Management of Twin and Triplet Pregnancies in the Antenatal Period

This guideline contains recommendations specific to twin and triplet pregnancies and covers the following clinical areas: optimal methods to determine gestational age and chorionicity; maternal and fetal screening programmes to identify structural abnormalities, chromosomal abnormalities and feto-fetal transfusion syndrome (FFTS), and to detect intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR); the effectiveness of interventions to prevent spontaneous preterm birth; and routine (elective) antenatal corticosteroid prophylaxis for reducing perinatal morbidity. The guideline also advises how to give accurate, relevant and useful information to women with twin and triplet pregnancies and their families, and how best to support them.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: September 2011
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Induction of Labour

The purpose of this guideline is to review all aspects of the methodology of induction of labour and the appropriateness of different approaches in the various clinical circumstances that may call for such an intervention.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: July 2008
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Fetal assessment methods after preterm prelabour rupture of membranes for improving outcomes for mothers and babies

In a small number of pregnancies, the sac (membranes) surrounding the baby ruptures preterm, before 37 weeks of gestation, and before onset of labour. Preterm prelabour rupture of membranes (PPROM) occurs in around a third of all preterm births but the cause is often unknown. PPROM can result in illness and death for both the mother and baby through complications such as compression of the umbilical cord and bacteria infecting the uterus. The biggest problem for the baby is an increased risk of respiratory distress, brain haemorrhage and infection because of being born early. Several methods are available for assessing the wellbeing of the unborn baby following PPROM, to help healthcare providers detect any problems with the baby and make decisions on whether to deliver the baby earlier that they otherwise would. Most women will go into spontaneous labour within several days of PPROM.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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