Home > Search Results

A surgical procedure that uses the cutting power of a laser beam to make bloodless cuts in tissue or to remove a surface lesion such as a tumor.

Results: 1 to 20 of 681

Not enough evidence to support using low level laser therapy alongside drug treatments for tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious bacterial infection that can affect different parts of the body; most frequently it affects the lungs (pulmonary TB). Some bacteria can be drug resistant, and some people may have the infection alongside another medical condition. People suffer from severe cough, weakness and sweats, and some people still die from TB even though effective drug treatment has been around for many years. It is has been proposed that low level laser therapy may help the drugs to be more effective. There are a number of different devices for giving the laser treatment, some giving the treatment externally (to the body or acupuncture sites), some using for internal treatment (for blood or lungs) at varying doses. The review of trials found only one randomized trial where the data were poorly reported, and it did not clarify the potential benefits and harms. Low level laser therapy should only be used in randomized controlled trials until its value is evaluated.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Low level laser therapy for low‐back pain

Sixty to eighty per cent of people suffer from back pain at some time in their lives. Of those who develop acute low‐back pain (LBP), up to 30% will go on to develop chronic LBP. The toll on individuals, families and society makes the successful management of this common, but benign condition an important goal.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Low level laser therapy for rheumatoid arthritis

Six studies of medium quality were reviewed and provide the best evidence we have today. Collectively, these studies tested over 220 people with rheumatoid arthritis. The studies compared how well people did while receiving either laser therapy or a 'placebo' (fake) laser therapy. Laser therapy was given mostly on the hands and generally for two to three times a week for four weeks. There were also many different wavelengths and dosages given.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Laser-induced Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Liver Metastases [Internet]

Laser-induced thermotherapy is a non-surgical method for treating tumors in solid organs. The method is experimental and considered primarily in treating patients with liver metastases when surgery is not an option.

Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment (SBU).

Version: March 2, 2011

Radiotherapy versus open surgery versus endolaryngeal surgery (with or without laser) for early larynx cancer

Cancer of the larynx or voice box usually begins in the glottis (vocal cords) as a squamous cell cancer (cancer in the membranes). Most people survive these cancers when they get treatment early, before the cancer spreads further into the larynx and surrounding area. Options include radiotherapy, open surgery where access is through the neck or, more commonly now, endolaryngeal excision whereby the throat is reached through the mouth, sometimes with a laser.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Endovenous ablation (radiofrequency and laser) and foam sclerotherapy versus open surgery for varicose veins

Varicose veins are dilated, tortuous superficial veins. When they are in the legs they can be painful, itchy or unsightly, especially when patients are standing and walking. Varicose veins are conventionally treated with surgery to remove the veins, by stripping them to the level of the knee (so‐called high ligation and stripping). New less invasive treatments seal the main leaking vein in the thigh using foam sclerotherapy, laser (endovenous laser therapy) or radiofrequency ablation. These techniques may result in less pain after the procedure, fewer complications, and a quicker return to work and normal activities with improved patient quality of life, as well as avoiding the need for a general anaesthetic.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Transmyocardial laser revascularization compared to medical therapy for refractory angina

This review examines the effectiveness and safety of a surgical intervention using a laser device directly on the heart surface for patients suffering from angina for whom other interventions are not suitable. This is an updated version of the original review published in 2009.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Laser Therapy for Hyperhidrosis: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines [Internet]

The purpose of this report is to review the clinical effectiveness of laser therapy for hyperhidrosis and to review evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of laser therapy for hyperhidrosis.

Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: April 29, 2015
Show search results within this document

Laser trabeculoplasty for open angle glaucoma

Glaucoma is a chronic progressive disease of the optic nerve which, if not treated, leads to visual field decay and blindness at end stages. Intraocular pressure (IOP) decreasing is shown to diminish the progression of the disease, and could be achieved by the chronic use of hypotensive eyedrops, incisional surgery or laser trabeculoplasty. There is still great controversy about where in the treatment scale laser trabeculoplasty is positioned, although this technique has already been described three decades ago. This treatment consists of application of laser spots in the trabecular meshwork, the structure responsible for the aqueous humor drainage, leading to an increase in the outflow facility through it and in consequence, decreasing IOP. It is an interesting form of treatment since it does not depend on chronic instillation of eyedrops, as does medical treatment, and also does not have too many complications, as does incisional surgery. This review included 19 trials (2137 participants). One trial compared laser trabeculoplasty associated with a hypotensive eyedrop with no intervention, and at six years of follow up the risk of visual field decay was greater in non treated participants. Three trials compared hypotensive eyedrops with trabeculoplasty, and the risk of uncontrolled IOP was greater at two years in the laser group. It is necessary to mention that the eyedrops used in these trials differ significantly from the ones used currently, since these trials were developed a decade ago. Three other trials compared trabeculoplasty with trabeculectomy and the risk of uncontrolled IOP was higher in the laser group at six months of follow up. There is some evidence showing that diode laser and selective trabeculoplasty have similar effect in controlling IOP when compared to argon laser trabeculoplasty. Comparisons of different lasers and different techniques of application were done in the remaining trials, but there is still not enough evidence to determine which is the best treatment protocol. Further research is necessary to compare trabeculoplasty with new hypotensive eyedrops and also the results of laser therapy in people of different ethnicities, since some studies suggest that they have a different response to this kind of laser therapy. More research is required to analyse cost‐effectiveness of these interventions.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Laparoscopic 'drilling' by diathermy or laser for ovulation induction in anovulatory polycystic ovary syndrome

Ovarian surgery in women with clomiphene‐resistant polycystic ovarian syndrome reduces the risk of multiple pregnancy without decreasing the pregnancy rate. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have trouble ovulating. Some treatment schedules with medical ovulation induction can overstimulate the ovary and cause multiple pregnancy. An alternative is a minor surgical procedure called laparoscopic ovarian drilling, where a long telescope is passed through a small cut in the umbilicus. The ovaries are then surgically treated by drilling, using either heat or laser. This review of trials found that ovarian drilling without or with ovulation induction, if necessary, was as effective as medical ovulation induction alone in inducing ovulation, but the risk of multiple pregnancies was lower in the group of women who had laparoscopic ovarian drilling. Approximately 37% of women will have a live birth and 7% will have a miscarriage with either procedure.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Medicines given before, during, or after surgery to prevent short spikes of eye pressure after laser surgery for glaucoma

The aim of this Cochrane Review was to find out whether medicines given before, during, or after laser trabeculoplasty (LTP), a surgical method to reduce eye pressure, can prevent increased eye pressure shortly after surgery.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2017

Laser therapy for retinopathy in sickle cell disease

To evaluate the effectiveness of various techniques of laser photocoagulation in sickle cell disease‐related proliferative retinopathy (development of sight‐threatening complications due to excessive growth of blood vessels in the back of the eye).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Low-level laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome and chronic neck pain

Bibliographic details: Mark D.  Low-level laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome and chronic neck pain. Chicago, IL, USA: Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, Technology Evaluation Center. Assessment Program; 25,4. 2010 Available from: http://www.bcbs.com/blueresources/tec/vols/25/low-level-laser-therapy.html

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Endovenous ablation therapy (laser or radiofrequency) or foam sclerotherapy versus open surgery for the treatment of short saphenous varicose veins

Varicose veins (varices) are enlarged veins occurring below the skin's surface, usually in the legs. One‐third of the UK population may be affected. They can be painful and itchy, the surrounding skin may change colour, and occasionally they may bleed; in some people, untreated varicose veins may lead to ulceration. Varicose veins occur due to leaky valves within the veins. Traditionally, they were treated with surgery to remove the veins. Newer techniques require neither vein removal, nor a general anaesthetic; they may involve less pain after the procedure and have a lower risk of complications, resulting in quicker recovery and return to normal activities. Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are methods that seal the main leaking vein. They are performed using a local anaesthetic; a probe is passed into the vein: either a tiny laser or radiofrequency makes the wall of the vein heat up causing the vein to clot off and seal. With ultrasound‐guided foam sclerotherapy (UGFS), a foam is injected into the veins; the foam pushes the blood away, causing thickening and scarring of the inside of the vein so that it becomes blocked.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Laser peripheral iridoplasty for angle‐closure glaucoma

Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. Angle‐closure glaucoma describes one of the mechanisms which leads to glaucoma. In angle‐closure, the "angles" that act as drains for the aqueous in the eye are closed which leads to high eye ball pressure. Treatment is aimed at opening the drainage system and lowering the pressure in the eye with medical or surgical treatment or both. Laser peripheral iridoplasty is used in patients with angle‐closure when other treatments fail to open the anterior drainage system. It works by shrinking and pulling the peripheral iris tissue away from the trabecular meshwork (angles). Although one randomised controlled trial with 158 participants was found, due to its limitations and the lack of a statistically significant difference observed with laser peripheral iridoplasty intervention, this review found no strong evidence for the use of laser peripheral iridoplasty in the treatment of angle‐closure in the non‐acute setting.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Lung volume reduction surgery for adults with diffuse emphysema

Emphysema causes severe damage to the lungs, which leads to breathing problems. Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) may help improve symptoms by removing the most diseased and non‐functioning parts of the lung. However, this procedure has been the centre of much controversy with its possible benefit being outweighed by potential harms and costs.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2016

Laser therapy for the treatment of Hailey-Hailey disease: a systematic review with focus on carbon dioxide laser resurfacing

Benign familial chronic pemphigus, or Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD), is a recurrent bullous dermatitis that tends to have a chronic course with frequent relapses. Long-term treatment options include surgery with skin grafting or dermabrasion. Both are highly invasive and carry significant risks and complications. More recently, 'laser-abrasion' has been described as a less invasive option with a better side-effect profile. In this article, we systematically review the safety and efficacy of carbon dioxide laser therapy as a long-term treatment option for HHD, as well as provide a review of other lasers that have been reported with this goal. A total of 23 patients who had been treated with a carbon dioxide laser were identified. After treatment, 10 patients (43%) had had no recurrence, 10 (43%) had greater than 50% improvement, 2 (8%) had less than 50% improvement and 1 (4%) patient had no improvement at all (follow-up period ranged from 4 to 144 months). Laser parameter variability was wide and adverse effects were minimal, including dyspigmentation and scarring. Reviewed evidence indicates this therapy offers a safe, effective treatment alternative for HHD with minimal risk of side-effects. Larger, well-designed studies are necessary to determine the optimal treatment parameters.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Effectiveness of low-level laser therapy for lateral elbow tendinopathy

OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of low-lever laser therapy (LLLT) in the management of lateral elbow tendinopathy (LET) and to provide recommendations based on this evidence.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

A systematic review and meta-analysis on the efficacy of low-level laser therapy in the management of complication after mandibular third molar surgery

The successful reduction of postoperative discomfort is of great significance. This review aims to evaluate the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for the reduction of complication caused by impacted mandibular third molars extraction. An extensive literature search up to October 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed through CENTRAL, PubMed, Embase, Medline, and CNKI. Six RCTs in which involves 193 participants are included in the meta-analysis. Among them, three RCTs exhibit a moderate risk of bias, while the other three show a high bias risk. Compared with placebo laser/control group, pain is significantly reduced with LLLT on the first day (mean difference [MD] = -2.63, 95 % confidence interval [CI] -4.46 to -0.79, P = 0.005). The superiority of LLLT in pain control persists on the second day (MD = -2.34, 95 % CI -4.61 to -0.06, P = 0.04) and the third day (MD = -3.40, 95 % CI -4.12 to -2.68, P < 0.00001). Moreover, LLLT reduces an average of 4.94 mm (MD = 4.94, 95 % CI 1.53 to 8.34, P = 0.004) of trismus compared with placebo laser irradiation in the first 3 days. On the seventh day, the superiority of LLLT also persists (MD = 3.24, 95 % CI 0.37 to 6.12, P = 0.03). In the first 3 days after surgery, extraoral irradiation (MD = -0.69, 95 % CI -1.30 to -0.08, P = 0.03) and intraoral combined with extraoral irradiation (MD = -0.65, 95 % CI -1.15 to -0.15, P = 0.01) reduced facial swelling significantly. On the seventh day, the intraoral combined with extraoral irradiation group (MD = -0.32, 95 % CI -0.59 to -0.06, P = 0.02) still showed benefit in relieving facial swelling. However, because of the heterogeneity of intervention and outcomes assessment and risk of bias of included trials, the efficacy is proved with limited evidence. In the future, well-designed RCTs with larger sample size will be required to provide clearer recommendations.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Laser Treatment of Neck Pain [Internet]

Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment (SBU).

Version: May 20, 2014

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (1915)...

Systematic Review Methods in PubMed

See all (9)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...