Home > Search Results

Results: 1 to 20 of 139

Clear

It is difficult to know what the true incidence of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is in England and Wales because the cases are not systematically recorded. However, evidence from an audit carried out in Scotland between 1997 and 1999 and from a published study from Ontario, Canada, suggests that the incidence may be up to 80 cases per million population per year. This would mean around 4000 cases per year in England and Wales or more than 100 cases per cancer network per year.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: November 2008

Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used for the diagnosis of acute ischaemic stroke but its sensitivity for the early detection of intracerebral haemorrhage has been debated. Computed tomography (CT) is extensively used in the clinical management of acute stroke, especially for the rapid exclusion of intracerebral haemorrhage.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Study finds that magnetic resonance with diffusion-weighted imaging is not cost-effective for routine transient ischaemic attack/minor stroke investigation.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: April 2014

AIM: Structural connectivity analysis using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) and tractography has become the method of choice for studying white matter pathology and reorganization in children with congenital hemiplegia. To evaluate its role in the research domain, we systematically reviewed the literature about children with cerebral palsy (CP) to document common findings and identify strengths and possible limitations of this neuroimaging technology.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Medical technologies are continually changing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is no exception, where increasing the magnet strength has produced more sophisticated device capabilities. A systematic review of the evidence comparing the clinical applications of 1.5 Tesla (T) MRI with those of 3.0 T MRI aims to provide health care decision makers such as government purchasers, health care planners, and clinicians with information about the clinical effectiveness and institutional efficiency of the 1.5 T MRI and 3.0 T MRI.

CADTH Optimal Use Report - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: May 2011

PURPOSE: To perform a meta-analysis of all available studies of the diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in patients with hepatic metastases.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Current treatment protocols using reperfusion therapy for acute ischemic stroke rely on non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT), with most indications including the absence of acute hemorrhage or large volume of infarction in the presence of clinical signs and symptoms. This predictably results in a significant incidence of the administration of reperfusion therapy to patients with "stroke mimics," such as migraine headache or Todd's paralysis after a seizure. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a technique based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may be more sensitive and specific for acute cerebral ischemia than NCCT. In addition, data for techniques such as perfusion-weighted imaging can be acquired with minimal additional time required. This may allow better risk assessment of a clinical response to reperfusion therapy vs. the possibility of hemorrhagic complications. This article describes a methodical review of studies comparing the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of DWI vs. NCCT in the evaluation of acute ischemic stroke. Data from studies meeting our screening criteria are combined to produce overall values for each.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2006

The original Prostate Cancer: Diagnosis and Treatment Guideline published in 2008 was the first clinical guideline produced by the National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (NCC-C); accordingly this is now the first NCC-C clinical guideline to be reviewed and updated. Many areas of the original guideline are unchanged as there is little or no new evidence; other aspects have been completely rewritten. As ever there are still many topics where the research evidence is incomplete or conflicting, and so the Guideline Development Group (GDG) have been required to reach a consensus using the evidence available to them in several areas. In places where it was clear that further work needed to be done, new research recommendations have been made which we hope will be used as the basis for future research work.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: January 2014

Study assessing the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in aiding the localisation of prostate abnormalities for biopsy found that MRS had higher sensitivity and specificity than T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2-MRI) but produced no definitive conclusions on the cost-effectiveness of using different MRS/MRI sequences.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: May 2013

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary malignant neoplasm of the liver, and accurate diagnosis and staging of HCC are important for guiding treatment and other clinical decisions. A number of imaging modalities are available for detection of HCC in surveillance and nonsurveillance settings, evaluation of focal liver lesions to identify HCC, and staging of HCC. The purpose of this review is to compare the effectiveness of imaging techniques for HCC on test performance, clinical decisionmaking, clinical outcomes, and harms.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: October 2014

OBJECTIVE: A systematic review to determine whether the diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging scan can reliably detect residual or recurrent cholesteatoma after mastoid surgery.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

A meta-analysis was performed to assess and compare the accuracies of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for the staging of hepatic fibrosis. Online journal databases and a manual search from January 2000 to May 2011 were used. We identified 41 studies, but only 14 met the criteria to perform a meta-analysis assessing MRE (five trials) or DWI (10 trials). Fibrosis was categorized by redistribution into five stages according to histopathological description. A bivariate binomial model was used to combine the sensitivity and specificity and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs), from which diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), and summary receiver operating characteristic (sROC) were derived to indicate the diagnostic accuracy of imaging modalities. With MRE, the sensitivity, specificity, DOR, PLR, NLR, and area under sROC curve (with 95% CIs) for staging F0 ∼ F1 versus F2 ∼ F4 and F0 ∼ F2 versus F3 ∼ F4 were 0.94 (0.81-0.98), 0.95 (0.87-0.98), 20 (7-57), 0.06 (0.02-0.22), 317 (55-1,796), 0.98 (0.97-0.99) and 0.92 (0.85-0.96), 0.96 (0.91-0.98), 21 (10-45), 0.08 (0.04-0.16), 251 (103-609), and 0.98 (0.96-0.99), respectively; and with DWI, these values were 0.77 (0.71-0.82), 0.78 (0.69-0.85), 3 (2-5), 0.30 (0.22-0.40), 12 (6-21), 0.83 (0.79-0.86) and 0.72 (0.60-0.81), 0.84 (0.77-0.89), 5 (3-7), 0.34 (0.23-0.50), 13 (6-29), and 0.86 (0.83-0.89), respectively. A z test demonstrated that MRE had a significantly higher accuracy than DWI in those indicators (P < 0.05).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in prostate cancer.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

CONCLUSION: This review highlights the currently limited and contradictory evidence on the role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in the management of pediatric cholesteatoma patients. Available data confirm the need for prospective DW-MRI studies of a larger number of pediatric patients. Factors such as patient compliance, adhesion to follow-up or local logistic circumstances should also be considered.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

BACKGROUND: To compare the diagnostic capability of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) in the N stage assessment in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to estimate and compare the performance of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with other MRI techniques including T2-weighted MRI for the detection of prostate cancer.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

BACKGROUND: The mismatch between perfusion and diffusion lesions on magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI)/diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) may help identify patients for thrombolysis. Evidence underlying this hypothesis was assessed.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2007

PURPOSE: To perform a meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) technique in differentiating malignant from benign lung lesions.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

BACKGROUND: We sought to determine the comparative diagnostic performance of standard b-value (800-1000 s/mm2) versus low b-value (400-500 s/mm2) diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in the detection of renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

PURPOSE: To assess diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI-MRI) performed with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for the detection of cervical lymphadenopathy.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (459)...

Systematic Review Methods in PubMed

See all (6)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...