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Xingnaojing in the treatment of acute alcohol intoxication: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Yang YH, Ding R, Liu F, Zhai SD.  Xingnaojing in the treatment of acute alcohol intoxication: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2009; 9(9): 957-963

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Psychosocial and Developmental Alcohol Misuse Prevention in Schools can be effective

We conducted a Cochrane systematic review of 53 well‐designed experimental studies that examined the effectiveness of school‐based universal programs for the prevention of alcohol misuse in young people. The studies were divided into two major groups based on the nature of the prevention program: 1) programs targeting specifically prevention or reduction of alcohol misuse and 2) generic programs with wider focus for prevention (e.g., other drug use/abuse, antisocial behavior). In the review we found studies that showed no effects of the preventive program, as well as studies that demonstrated statistically significant effects. There was no easily discernible pattern in program characteristics that would distinguish studies with positive results from those with no effects. Most commonly observed positive effects across programs were for drunkenness and binge drinking. In conclusion, current evidence suggests that certain generic psychosocial and developmental prevention programs can be effective and could be considered as policy and practice options. These include the Life Skills Training Program, the Unplugged program, and the Good Behaviour Game.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

[Computer-assisted brief interventions in emergency care facilities for patients with risky alcohol use: a narrative literature review]

Bibliographic details: Neumann T, Krampe H, Neuner B, Wei-ssGerlach E, Spies C.  [Computer-assisted brief interventions in emergency care facilities for patients with risky alcohol use: a narrative literature review]. [Computergestutzte kurzinterventionen in einrichtungen der notfallversorgung fur patienten mit riskantem alkoholkonsum: ein narratives literaturreview.] Suchtmedizin in Forschung und Praxis 2014; 16(4): 173-180 Available from: http://www.ecomed-suchtmedizin.de/archiv/suchtmedizin-band-16-nr-4-2014

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Alcohol interventions, alcohol policy and intimate partner violence: a systematic review

BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant global public health issue. The consistent evidence that alcohol use by one or both partners contributes to the risk and severity of IPV suggests that interventions that reduce alcohol consumption may also reduce IPV. This study sought to review the evidence for effects on IPV of alcohol interventions at the population, community, relationship and individual levels using the World Health Organization ecological framework for violence.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Alcohol Use Disorders: Diagnosis and Clinical Management of Alcohol-Related Physical Complications [Internet]

Alcohol is the most widely used psychotropic drug in the industrialised world; it has been used for thousands of years as a social lubricant and anxiolytic. In the UK, it is estimated that 24% of adult men and 13% of adult women drink in a hazardous or harmful way. Levels of hazardous and harmful drinking are lowest in the central and eastern regions of England (21–24% of men and 10–14% of women). They are highest in the north (26–28% of men, 16–18% of women). Hazardous and harmful drinking are commonly encountered amongst hospital attendees; 12% of emergency department attendances are directly related to alcohol whilst 20% of patients admitted to hospital for illnesses unrelated to alcohol are drinking at potentially hazardous levels. Continued hazardous and harmful drinking can result in dependence and tolerance with the consequence that an abrupt reduction in intake might result in development of a withdrawal syndrome. In addition, persistent drinking at hazardous and harmful levels can also result in damage to almost every organ or system of the body. Alcohol-attributable conditions include liver damage, pancreatitis and the Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Key areas in the investigation and management of these conditions are covered in this guideline.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: 2010
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Motivational interviewing interventions and alcohol abuse among college students: a systematic review

OBJECTIVE: The study sought to assess the effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing (MI) interventions in reducing alcohol consumption among college students, as compared to no intervention or alternative interventions. It also sought to identify the potential moderators to MI intervention effects.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Pharmacotherapy for Adults With Alcohol-Use Disorders in Outpatient Settings [Internet]

To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the efficacy, comparative effectiveness, and harms of medications (both FDA approved and others) for adults with alcohol-use disorders, and to evaluate the evidence from primary care settings.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: May 2014
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Efficacy of expectancy challenge interventions to reduce college student drinking: a meta-analytic review

Interventions challenging alcohol expectancies may lead to reductions in alcohol consumption. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the efficacy of alcohol expectancy challenge (EC) interventions for college alcohol abuse prevention. Included were 14 studies (19 EC interventions) that measured alcohol expectancies and consumption, provided sufficient information to calculate effect sizes, and were available as of June 2010 (N=1,415; M age=20 years; 40% women; 88% White). Independent raters coded participant characteristics, design and methodological features, and intervention content, and calculated weighted mean effect sizes at first follow-up, using both fixed and random effects models. Compared with controls, EC participants reported lower positive alcohol expectancies, reduced their alcohol use, and reduced their frequency of heavy drinking (d+s ranged from 0.23 to 0.28). Within-group improvements in alcohol expectancies and consumption emerged for the EC group only; relative to their own baseline, EC participants reported lower positive alcohol expectancies, reduced their alcohol use, and reduced their frequency of heavy drinking (d+s ranged from 0.13 to 0.36). Supplemental analyses found improvements in specific alcohol expectancies (social, sexual, tension, and arousal) both between groups and within group. The short-term effects of EC interventions on college student drinking are not maintained at follow-ups greater than 4 weeks.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Are interventions that are implemented in alcohol server settings (e.g. bars and pubs) effective for preventing injuries?

Injuries are a significant public health burden and alcohol intoxication (i.e. drunkenness) is recognised as a risk factor for injuries; indeed the effects of alcohol lead to a considerable proportion of all injuries. Alcohol‐associated injuries are a problem in both high‐ and low‐income countries.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

[Web-based interventions for addressing college drinking].

Bibliographic details: Laging M.  [Web-based interventions for addressing college drinking]. [Internetbasierte Alkoholpravention bei Studierenden.] Sucht 2012; 58(2): 85-96 Available from: http://www.psycontent.com/content/657313363530404m/?p=4486a909a4b743d8814227c32599351d&pi=1

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Interventions for preventing or treating alcohol hangover: systematic review of randomised controlled trials

This review assessed a variety of conventional and complementary interventions to prevent or treat alcohol hangover. The authors concluded that there was no strong evidence for the effectiveness of any of the included interventions. Some omissions in reporting and the failure to address potential confounding factors may mean that the reliability of the results, and thus the authors' conclusions, are unclear.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

The effectiveness of limiting alcohol outlet density as a means of reducing excessive alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harms

The review concluded that greater alcohol outlet density was associated with increased alcohol consumption and related harms that included medical harms, crime and violence; reduced alcohol outlet density can be an effective means of controlling excessive alcohol consumption and harms. The review had some methodological problems and data limitations that limited the reliability of the authors’ conclusions.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Effectiveness of multicomponent programs with community mobilization for reducing alcohol-impaired driving

This review concluded that there was strong evidence that carefully planned well-executed multicomponent programmes in conjunction with community mobilisation were effective in reducing alcohol-related crashes and costs. However, given the methodological limitations of the included studies and risk of missing data, the authors' conclusions appeared to be overstated and may not be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Computer-based interventions for college drinking: a qualitative review

This review investigated the effects of computer-based interventions on the reduction of risky college drinking. The authors concluded that computer-based interventions were more effective in reducing the risky drinking for college students than no treatment and approximately equivalent to alternative intervention approaches. The authors' conclusions reflected the evidence presented. However, the lack of study quality assessment and limitations in the review process suggested that the authors' conclusions may not be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Pharmacotherapy for Adults With Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) in Outpatient Settings

This is a summary of a systematic review evaluating the evidence regarding the efficacy comparative effectiveness, and adverse effects of medications in adults with alcohol use disorder (AUD). The systematic review included 167 articles reporting on 135 eligible studies published from January 1, 1970, to October 11, 2013. The full report, listing all studies, is available at www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/alcohol-disorder. This summary is provided to inform discussions with patients and/or caregivers of treatment options and to assist in decisionmaking along with consideration of a patient's values and preferences. However, reviews of evidence should not be construed to represent clinical recommendations or guidelines.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Clinicians [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: February 16, 2016

Alcohol-Use Disorders: Diagnosis, Assessment and Management of Harmful Drinking and Alcohol Dependence

This clinical guideline on alcohol-use disorders was commissioned by NICE and developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health, and sets out the evidence for the treatment and management of harmful drinking and alcohol dependence in adults and in young people aged 10 to 17 years.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2011
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e-Interventions for Alcohol Misuse [Internet]

Alcohol misuse is the third leading cause of preventable death in the United States and the third leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The associated costs amount to more than 1% of the gross national product in high- and middle-income countries. Substance use disorders, including alcohol use disorder (AUD), are among the most common and most costly conditions in Veterans presenting for treatment in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) system.

Evidence-based Synthesis Program - Department of Veterans Affairs (US).

Version: September 2014
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Behavioral Counseling Interventions in Primary Care to Reduce Risky/Harmful Alcohol Use [Internet]

Excessive alcohol consumption increases risks for numerous chronic diseases, injuries, disabilities, mortality, and for a host of social and interpersonal problems. Many drinkers who do not meet diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorders nonetheless consume alcohol at levels or in patterns that increase the risks of negative health and social consequences. Primary health care visits offer opportunities to identify and briefly intervene with these drinkers to reduce their consumption below at-risk levels and patterns.

Systematic Evidence Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: March 2004
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Family Involved Psychosocial Treatments for Adult Mental Health Conditions: A Review of the Evidence [Internet]

Since 2008, the President has signed two new laws expanding VA authority to provide family services for Veterans’ mental health care and creating a need to identify efficacious and promising family involved interventions for improving Veterans’ mental health outcomes. With one exception, prior reviews have traditionally focused on one condition at a time, limiting comparisons across conditions and preventing a synthesis of the evidence for all mental health conditions, including those with few randomized controlled trials (RCTs; e.g., Posttraumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD). Finally, prior reviews are potentially less relevant to VA populations due to their focus on studies conducted in non-Veteran populations.

Evidence-based Synthesis Program - Department of Veterans Affairs (US).

Version: February 2012
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Use of Antipsychotics and/or Benzodiazepines as Rapid Tranquilization in In-Patients of Mental Facilities and Emergency Departments: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines [Internet]

Patients with psychotic illnesses may exhibit agitated, threatening, or destructive behaviour that could be dangerous to themselves or others. Researchers have found that as many as 1 in 5 individuals admitted to acute psychiatric units may commit an act of violence while in hospital. Additional research suggests that patients with psychosis who have a history of violence or substance abuse may be at an increased risk of committing violence. To ensure a safe environment, clinical practice guidelines suggest that health care providers first use verbal de-escalation techniques to engage agitated patients. In some cases, however, verbal de-escalation may be ineffective, thereby necessitating the use of alternative management approaches. One such strategy is rapid tranquilization, the aim for which is to use psychotropic medications “to calm/lightly sedate the service user, reduce the risk to self and/or others and achieve an optimal reduction in agitation and aggression.” Ideally, medications for rapid tranquilization should have a rapid onset of action, result in few adverse effects, and have a short duration of action. Empirical evidence suggests that clinicians often prefer to use two major drug classes – benzodiazepines and antipsychotics, either alone or in combination – to manage agitated patients. Intramuscular (IM) injections of these drugs appear attractive as they may offer superior pharmacokinetic properties and more favourable clinical profiles versus their respective oral formulations.

Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: October 29, 2015
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