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‐ May improve pain at three weeks.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: January 23, 2008

Frozen shoulder is a common cause of shoulder pain and stiffness. The pain and stiffness can last up to two to three years before going away, and in the early stages it can be very painful.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: October 1, 2014

Frozen shoulder is a common cause of shoulder pain and stiffness. The pain and stiffness can last up to two to three years before going away, and in the early stages it can be very painful.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: August 26, 2014

There is silver level evidence (www.cochranemsk.org) that oral steroids may work to treat shoulder pain (adhesive capsulitis) in the short term. Oral steroids may decrease pain and disability, and may improve movement in the shoulder in the short term. But the benefits of oral steroids may not last 6 weeks. Oral steroids taken for short periods in people who are otherwise healthy may not cause harms. There is not enough evidence to be certain of the benefits and harms of oral steroids and more research is needed.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: October 18, 2006

Bibliographic details: Griesser MJ, Harris JD, Campbell JE, Jones GL.  Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: a systematic review of the effectiveness of intra-articular corticosteroid injections. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American volume 2011; 93(18): 1727-173321938377

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Bibliographic details: Ortiz-Lucas M, Hijazo-Larrosa S, Estebanez-De Miguel E.  [Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: a systematic review]. [Capsulitis adhesiva del hombro: una revision sistematica.] Fisioterapia 2010; 32(5): 229-235 Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0211563810000623

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

The available evidence from randomized controlled trials supports the use of subacromial corticosteroid injection for rotator cuff disease, although its effect may be small and short‐lived, and it may be no better than non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs. Similarly, intra‐articular steroid injection may be of limited, short‐term benefit for adhesive capsulitis. Further trials investigating the efficacy of corticosteroid injections for shoulder pain are needed. Important issues that need clarification include whether the accuracy of needle placement, anatomical site, frequency, dose and type of corticosteroid influences efficacy.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: January 20, 2003

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Frozen shoulder is a common condition, yet its treatment remains challenging. In this review, the current best evidence for the use of physical therapy interventions (PTI) is evaluated.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Frozen shoulder starts out very gradually. The pain is usually only mild at first, but becomes more severe over the course of a few months and often makes it hard to sleep. Over time the shoulder can become so stiff that it is nearly impossible to move, as if “frozen” in place. At what age are people most commonly affected by frozen shoulder? And what can help relieve the symptoms until it gets better on its own?

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: November 5, 2015

Impingement (or pinching) of soft‐tissues in or around the shoulder is a common cause of pain and is often linked to tissue damage in and around the joint. If doctors and therapists could identify impingement and associated damage using simple, physical tests, it would help them to inform on the best treatment approach at an early stage. We were particularly interested in the primary (community) care setting, because this is where most shoulder pain is diagnosed and managed. We reviewed original research papers for evidence on the accuracy of physical tests for shoulder impingement or associated damage, in people whose symptoms and/or history suggest any of these disorders. To find the research papers, we searched the main electronic databases of medical and allied literature up to 2010. Two review authors screened assessed the quality of each research paper and extracted important information. If multiple research papers reported using the same test for the same condition, we intended to combine their results to gain a more precise estimate of the test's accuracy. We included 33 research papers. These related to studies of 4002 shoulders in 3852 patients. None of the studies exclusively looked at patients from primary care, though two recruited some of their patients from primary care. The majority of studies used arthroscopic surgery as the reference standard. There were 170 different target condition/index test combinations but only six instances where the same test was used in the same way, and for the same reason, in two studies. For this reason combining results was not appropriate. We concluded that there is insufficient evidence upon which to base selection of physical tests for shoulder impingement, and potentially related conditions, in primary care.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: April 30, 2013

INTRODUCTION: The optimal management of olecranon bursitis is ill-defined. The purposes of this review were to systematically evaluate clinical outcomes for aseptic versus septic bursitis, compare surgical versus nonsurgical management, and examine the roles of corticosteroid injection and aspiration in aseptic bursitis.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

OBJECTIVE: To provide an evidence-based overview of the effectiveness of interventions for 4 nontraumatic painful disorders sharing the anatomic region of the elbow: cubital tunnel syndrome, radial tunnel syndrome, elbow instability, and olecranon bursitis.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

This review concluded that multiple corticosteroid injections for the treatment of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder improved pain and range of motion for 6 to 16 weeks from the first injection. There was no evidence that treatment with more than six injections was effective. However, the authors’ conclusions are uncertain given the lack of reported results.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2007

OBJECTIVE: To assess the literature on outcomes of corticosteroid injections for adhesive capsulitis, and, in particular, image-guided corticosteroid injections. TYPE: Systematic search and review.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Frozen shoulder is condition in which movement of the shoulder becomes restricted. It can be described as either primary (idiopathic) whereby the aetiology is unknown, or secondary, when it can be attributed to another cause. It is commonly a self-limiting condition, of approximately 1 to 3 years' duration, though incomplete resolution can occur.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: March 2012

The review concluded that corticosteroids injections had a greater effect in the short-term compared with physiotherapy; the effect decreased over time. The authors stated that the results must be interpreted with caution due to the limited number of trials and differences between interventions. The review was generally well conducted and the authors’ conclusions are suitably cautious and appear appropriate.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

This review concluded that there was no clear difference between manipulation under anaesthesia versus arthroscopic capsular release in idiopathic or secondary-systemic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. A well-designed prospective cohort study or randomised controlled trial to directly compare the interventions was needed. Despite uncertainty over the reliability of the review results, the conclusion and recommendations are probably reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

There is a high prevalence of shoulder disorders in the community. Shoulder disorders can result in considerable pain and disability. Physiotherapy is often the first line of treatment for shoulder disorder. Twenty‐six trials presented sufficient data to be included in meta‐analysis. There is some evidence from methodologically weak trials to indicate that some physiotherapy interventions are effective for some specific shoulder disorders. The results overall provide little evidence to guide treatment. There is a clear need for further high quality trials of physiotherapy interventions, including trials using combinations of modalities, in the treatment of shoulder disorders.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: April 22, 2003

To answer this question, scientists found and analyzed 9 research studies. The studies tested over 500 people who had shoulder pain. People had either acupuncture, a placebo (fake therapy), ultrasound, gentle movement or exercises usually for 20‐30 minutes, two to three times a week for 3 to 6 weeks. Even though the studies were small and not of the highest quality, this Cochrane review provides the best evidence we have today.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: April 20, 2005

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effects of botulinum toxin on shoulder pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: September 8, 2010

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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