Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

Compr Psychiatry. 2017 Oct;78:1-8. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2017.06.008. Epub 2017 Jun 21.

Predictors of comorbid eating disorders and association with other obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders in trichotillomania.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: egreenberg@partners.org.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address: jgrant4@bsd.uchicago.edu.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: eecurley@mgh.harvard.edu.
4
SU/UCT MRC Unit on Anxiety and Stress Disorders, Department of Psychiatry, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa. Electronic address: cl2@sun.ac.za.
5
Department of Psychology, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI, USA. Electronic address: douglas.woods@marquette.edu.
6
Department of Psychology, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: etung@bu.edu.
7
Department of Psychiatry and MRC Unit on Anxiety & Stress Disorders, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. Electronic address: dan.stein@uct.ac.za.
8
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address: sredden@bsd.uchicago.edu.
9
Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Psychiatric & Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit, Center for Human Genetics Research, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: jscharf@partners.org.
10
Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: nkeuthen@partners.org.

Abstract

Trichotillomania (TTM) and eating disorders (ED) share many phenomenological similarities, including ritualized compulsive behaviors. Given this, and that comorbid EDs may represent additional functional burden to hair pullers, we sought to identify factors that predict diagnosis of an ED in a TTM population. Subjects included 555 adult females (age range 18-65) with DSM-IV-TR TTM or chronic hair pullers recruited from multiple sites. 7.2% (N=40) of our TTM subjects met criteria for an ED in their lifetime. In univariable regression analysis, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) worst-ever compulsion and total scores, certain obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders, anxiety disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and substance disorder all met the pre-specified criteria for inclusion in the multivariable analysis. In the final multivariable model, diagnosis of OCD (OR: 5.68, 95% CI: 2.2-15.0) and diagnosis of an additional body-focused repetitive behavior disorder (BFRB) (OR: 2.69, 95% CI: 1.1-6.8) were both associated with increased risk of ED in TTM. Overall, our results provide further support of the relatedness between ED and TTM. This finding highlights the importance of assessing for comorbid OCD and additional BFRBs in those with TTM. Future research is needed to identify additional predictors of comorbid disorders and to better understand the complex relationships between BFRBs, OCD and EDs.

PMID:
28667830
DOI:
10.1016/j.comppsych.2017.06.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center