Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Investig Med. 2003 May;51(3):141-8. doi: 10.1136/jim-51-03-16.

Patient education strategies to improve pneumococcal vaccination rates: randomized trial.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The pneumococcal vaccine is widely underused. Patient education is one mechanism not widely explored for increasing vaccination rates.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effects of a culturally appropriate patient education videotape on pneumococcal vaccination rates among the clinic population of an inner-city public hospital.

METHODS:

Randomized, controlled trial comparing (1) a videotape-brochure group who both viewed the videotape and received a low-literacy brochure, (2) a videotape only group, and (3) a control group.

RESULTS:

Of 2,962 charts reviewed, 558 patients were randomized. The study population was 94% black, 73% female, and elderly (mean age 63.0 years) and 64% had less than a high school education. Patients in the videotape-brochure group were 2.5 (1.8, 3.5 95% CI) times more likely to discuss the vaccine with their physician (p < .001) and 3.5 (1.9, 6.5 95% CI) times more likely to receive the vaccine (p < .001) than the control group. The videotape-brochure group was 1.6 (1.2, 2.1 95% CI) times more likely to discuss the vaccine (p < .001) and 2.3 (1.4, 3.8 95% CI) times more likely to receive the vaccine (p = .002) than the video only group. Patients in the video only group were 1.6 (1.1, 2.3 95% CI) times more likely to discuss the vaccine with their physician than the control group (p = .041) but were not more likely to receive the vaccine.

CONCLUSION:

A culturally appropriate videotape along with a low-literacy brochure significantly increased pneumococcal vaccination rates and physician-patient discussion about the vaccine. These significant outcomes were not observed with use of videotape alone and were likely attributable to the effect of the brochure. We recommend that patient education initiatives to increase vaccination rates not focus solely on audiovisual media.

PMID:
12769196
DOI:
10.1136/jim-51-03-16
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center